The Influence Of Edward VI On The Church Of England

Improved Essays
The era between the death of Henry VIII and the excommunication of Elizabeth by the papacy was one consumed by the debate of what the Church of England should looks like. Edward VI was a Protestant,and he made strides to define the Church of England as a Protestant church, instead of leaving the church as mostly Catholic in practice like his father had. Mary I, on the other hand, tried to revert England back to Catholicism. And finally, Elizabeth I started her reign by being diplomatic, careful not to lean on Protestantism or Catholicism too much, but as she spent more time as the monarch she became more and more Protestant and her policies illuminated that shift. Each monarch contributed to the religious debate that had taken over England, …show more content…
They all decided that in order for the Church of England to function properly and control the subjects it needed a clear dogma.
Edward VI worked with Thomas Cromwell to create a perfect Protestant England. Edward redefined Christianity much more than his father did, subscribing to actual Protestant beliefs and making policies to implement them in the common English way of life. These protestant beliefs included: all human sins,past and present, being forgiven as a result to Jesus’ sacrifice-- the slate was wiped clean, baptism and other sacraments, such as worshiping saints, was deemed blasphemous, and the eucharist was an affront to God’s will--because it implied that God did not have the power to save humanity alone, he needed the helpof the church(lecture, 9/14/16). As a result of these beliefs Edward VI and Cromwell issued injunctions and rules that parish churches had to follow in order to keep in line with the law. These rules included: every church having a copy of the Bible in English, so the principle of sola scriptura could be accessible to everyone, all images and saints being removed, shrines
…show more content…
There was a small percentage of people in England who backed Mary’s reforms, but many members in Parliament did not want to give up the lands that they had acquired through the dissolution of monasteries under Edward VI (eme110). To some extent Mary was able to achieve her goal of a Catholic restoration in Parliament, but the dissolved institutions themselves would not be restored and there were no funds available for Mary to do it herself (eme 111). While Mary did order the parish churches to bring back Catholicism many did complied, but did so half heartedly. In 15554 and 1555 St. Edmund 's Parish in Salisbury bought an abundance of cloth, instead of gold, because they could not afford to restore the church to full Catholicism extravagance. It is also possible that they did not want to make an invest in converting their church to Catholicism only to have to convert back to Protestantism after Mary’s reign ( “Accounts and Inventories of St Edmund’s Parish, Salisbury”, 1527-1557, 37-38). This was a wise move on the Parish’s part because England did eventually revert back to Protestantism. This change was largely in part to Mary’s cruelty in her Persecution of Protestants creating martyrs for Protestants to grieve. Even a Catholic Eyewitness expressed pity at the burning at the stake of Protestant theologian Thomas Cramer, “ I think there was none that

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Her removal of the Papacy legitimized herself as Queen. This, however, was not Elizabeth I’s only reason to remove Roman Catholicism – Elizabeth I intended specific religious reform. In 1559, Elizabeth I established the Elizabethan Settlement which created a religion substantially more like Protestantism . England remained predominantly Catholic until Elizabeth I’s reign, when she established the ‘via media’ between Catholicism and Protestantism . The via media is the middle grounds between Catholicism and Protestantism.…

    • 2463 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    King Henry VII believed he had full power and was the head of the Church. He ended up separating from the Church after he was rejected from having a divorce approved by the Pope. Martin Luther on the other hand, acted out because the Catholic Church was selling indulgences just so people could buy their way out of Purgatory. Unlike Henry, Luther thought that the Catholic Church was using the it’s power and wealth wrong, such as selling indulgences, and that having faith in God was being a loyal follower. Although both did end up separating and creating a new religious group, the events that caused them to do so were very different but also quite similar at the same…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the late 1520s, England had dissolved its ties with the Catholic church when the pope denied Henry the VIII 's request of an annulment from his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, as a result from failure to produce a male heir. The doctrine of new English church remained efficiently Catholic. Under the rule of Edward VI between 1547 and 1553, “England progressed towards becoming a Protestant nation” (). “The Archibishop Crammer oversaw the publication of an English version of the prayer book that maintained the outer forms of Catholic worship but was based on Protestant theology” (). In 1533, Queen Mary attempted to restore Catholicism when she took the throne, however, since she ruled the throne for a short period of time and failed to produce an heir, the change did not last.…

    • 1504 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ferdinand II was a devout Catholic who disliked Protestants and initiated his own religion on the land. Hans Heberle stated that under Ferdinand “persecution arose, with war, rebellion, and the shedding of much Christian blood” when Ferdinand attempted to restore his religion. Heberle being a devout Lutheran would have a oppositional of Catholics, and so could over-emphasise Ferdinand’s impact, so his description must not be taken as gospel. It has been interpreted that the initial trigger of the war was his election and his first attempts to re-Catholicise Bohemia which resulted in the 1618 Defenestration of Prague. Religious tensions were seen when he attempted to close Protestant Churches through the use of representatives (four Catholic Lords Regents) of the Holy Roman Empire, including Matthew Leopold Popel Lobcowitz who was the grand prior and exerted his authority on Bohemia for Ferdinand.…

    • 774 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    James I disliked Puritans and allowed no further reformation of the church (p. 17). Parliament became the bright hope for puritans as they thought its efforts would save them from God’s wrath (p. 22). The when Charles I took the throne things started to plummet both religiously and in the government. Charles, being married to a catholic princess, and a supporter of Arminianism alarmed the Puritans greatly. As evils in church and state multiplied, Puritans looked more and more to Parliament for relief (page 24).…

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Duffy dives into the “Catholic revisionism” debate, which is that most revisionist are catholic but in reality most are Protestants. The Catholics think that they were terrorized by the evil new religion whereas the protestants thought they were being saved from the tyranny of Catholicism. Duffy sides with slow reformation from higher powers. As shown, “Reformation had not been achieved on a tidal wave of popular enthusiasm, but had to be worked for, by force, persuasion, and slow institutional transformation”. Like Williams, Duffy believes that the reformation came to be with the establishment of new laws and propaganda to convince the people.…

    • 904 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Reformers like Martin Luther then used many steps in order to stop the Roman Catholic Church from doing wrong and opening the eyes of the people. The main goal of the Protestant Reformation was…

    • 391 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    This English King created his own church after the Pope would not allow him to annul his marriage. Due to Henry’s great desire to have a son through marriage to another women he created a Protestant religion centered around the Church of England. This new religion was basically the same as Catholicism except the head of the Church was not the Pope it was actually King Henry VII. The King saw this as a way to increase his own power in his country. The King also believed that through changing religions he could also experience a huge monetary gain.…

    • 1939 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Elizabethan Settlement

    • 1858 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Anna Keaton says that these changes had left the country in “a state of religions instability.” (Citar Anna) Elizabeth was raised Protestant, and for this reason, the Protestants who exiled to Geneva or Zurich during Mary’s reign and came back to England when Elizabeth became Queen, expected that she changed the religion to Protestantism. However, Elizabeth found herself in a serious problem - if she change her religion to Protestantism, she could provoke a civil war and a war with France or Spain. For this reason, she chose a way in which both religion could coexist peacefully. This was considered by some historians a via media or middle…

    • 1858 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Iconoclasm Analysis

    • 888 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Islam starting from the second it arose was stressing on destroying religious figures, and this prohibition was mentioned in both Quran and prophet’s sayings. As Christianity, the literal interpretation of the Ten Commandments prohibits representing God, so it is a religious inheritance that was mentioned in sacred religious texts. Additionally, since Christianity and Islam both believe in one God, there will surely be many beliefs in common between them. Plus, Islam as a religion came to continue what Christianity carried, so it is an accumulative historical and religious…

    • 888 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays