Labor Unions Evolution

778 Words 4 Pages
The labor unions operate under various Acts, which were implemented by the Congress to promote their progress. The first Act was the Lloyd-LaFollette Act that encourages workers to unionize for the purpose of collective bargaining. The other one is the Clayton Act that gave the labor unions the freedom from employer injunctions. The Clayton Act also legalized some activities of labor unions. In 1935, the Wagner National Labor Relations Act was implemented. The Act gave labor unions the right to establish work councils in which employees were the representatives. Through the Act, labor unions were given the right to seize defiant enterprises. The labor unions are also not liable to wrongful acts, which are described by the antitrust law. …show more content…
It states that they emerged as institutions for fighting for the well-being of average workers. They were aimed at eliminating inequalities and established pathways for immigrant populations during employment. Before the 1950s, the labor unions were successful in their roles. However, they began shrinking in the 1950s and by 1990s, they had declined following the opening up of the America to overseas markets, which increased competition in most industries. Consequently, most organizations began outsourcing in search for efficient employees. Outsourcing led to radical changes in the environment. Most US employers began engaging in illegal practices, and this was detrimental to the existing unions. Most employers threatened the sympathizers of unions that they would be dismissed. Discriminations also emerged, and this made the federal government begin emphasizing on the establishment of labor unions to fight for the concerns of employees. Powerful policy makers designed policies in favor of the unions and as a result, new unions were established and various rights accorded to them. This article is relevant because it discusses the history of labor unions, their downfall, and …show more content…
According to the article, there are three methods, which are recognition, imposition, and certification. In recognition, employers recognize unions following a realization that employees need unions. Employees may force employers to recognize unions through strikes and application of pressure. On the other hand, imposition involves the determination by a labor board that the actions of an employer have created an environment that denies employees the freedom of choice. After the determination, the board calls the employer for collective bargaining. Certification is the formation of unions even if the employer does not want it through a legal process. This article is important because it highlights the processes that should be followed in the formation of a labor union, for it to be eligible for the labor union

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