Karl Marx's Collapse Of Capitalism

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This essay will explain why Karl Marx’s predictions about the collapse of capitalism did not take place. Marx insisted on socialism being inverse of capitalism: where he declared capitalism unjust, socialism would be just; where he declared capitalism exploitative, socialism would be some opposite; where he declared worker to be alienated due to capitalism, in socialism the worker would be mystically engaged to his product of work; where he declared capitalism to be class-based, socialism would be classless.
According to the hypothesis of Marx in Das Capital, the capitalism will evolve in socialism when we will achieve an unlimited growth of the productive power. Marx (1867/1887) forecast both the immediate course of the development of capitalism
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This included the military, police, courts, and medical care However, he also believed that capitalism would reduce the cost of goods with a few exceptions. For example, face book gives out free weather reports. The benefits to society are greatest when this information is most widely disseminated. The costs (material and society) for trying to collect money for the information greatly exceeds the cost of producing and disseminating the information. Adam Smith was in many ways a socialist in that he believed that many things should be provided by the state. He felt that society would have to adapt to changes and that it would adapt to changes. If he faced the extreme left wing and right wing of today's society, his comment would probably be "Are you both …show more content…
The proletariat will use its political supremacy to wrest, by degrees, all capital from the bourgeoisie, to centralize all instruments of production in the hands of the State, i.e. of the proletariat organised as the ruling class; and to increase the total of productive forces as rapidly as possible”. His prediction may well have seemed grounded at the time as the proletariat were indeed suffering terribly in the period of transition to industrial economies. In fact however the proletariat showed little sign of awakening as a class. There was certainly social organization (such as unions) to ameliorate the worst excesses of capitalism but little sign of mass enthusiasm for revolutionary change. This fact was deeply puzzling to socialist theorists and thinkers such as Lukacs came up with theories of false consciousness and ideology to account for the fact. (Interesting, to this day the vast majority of people still have very little grasp on quite how unequally the piece is shared.) Those countries that did have revolutionary change were not led by the proletariat but by an intellectual vanguard e.g. Lenin, Mao. These activists had precious little help from Marx in how to administer a nation. The state of course did not wither away and

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