Marx's Concept Of Alienation According To Communism

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Marxism is a social, economic, and political philosophy founded by the philosopher Karl Marx. Marxism is a theory in which Marx introduces the breakdown of capitalism and replace it with communism. Marx combined different elements from different philosophers to come up with the concept of Marxism. He used Hegel’s dialectic process. From Feuerbach’s, he concluded that material conditions of life controls reality. Saint-Simson thought him how to observe a relationship of the landowner and the worker and learned the importance of economic conditions for a human life. After combining all this, he gave his theory many names other than Marxism like communism, historical materialism, dialectical materialism and many more. Beyond any doubts, Marx was …show more content…
Alienation occurs when the workers are no longer happy with their jobs and an individual has no meaningful purpose to work there other than for a pay check. Alienation makes workers distant from nature and from other people. They lose and forget who they really are and what they want to be. They separate them-selves from the natural world and just be limited as a working machines (AOW, 396-397). Marx represented four types of alienated labors that workers are suffering from working under the capitalism. First is when workers do not get the credit for the production of the product. Secondly, when worker experience a physical or mental suffering. Third, when workers are not allowed to put a human intelligence or power in producing a product and lastly, when workers replace relationships with a satisfaction of needs (Karl Marx, 2.3). Alienation is the most powerless and frustrated state. Workers rarely feel attached to product or producing labor. Marx believed we are most happy with our jobs when there is some meaningful work we enjoy to be engaged in and the worker must feel they own control over a product. It is proven that this is important to feel that way, not just morally but also psychologically. If not, then workers start suffering when they can’t or don’t want to put …show more content…
He wrote an article called “Theses on the Hegelian Philosophy,” in which he challenged Hegel’s believe of Absolute spirt. Feuerbach argued, the historical era was a material conditions of time instead of the abstract spirit of age. According to Feuerbach, that era controlled people’s behavior, thoughts, and beliefs. Marx also agreed with Feuerbach’s conclusion that reality was not spiritual, it’s material. He started viewing Feuerbach’s thesis more clearly by observing the way the landowners control the workers and also punishing workers when they make an effort at self-employment. Marx started writing about Feuerbach’s thesis in the journals, offered by a liberal publisher named Moses Hess and after reading Marx conclusion on materialism an obvious influence was seen in people but like any other communist, Karl Marx was also punished for his outspoken concerns for oppressors. Government of Germany shutdown the Hess’s journal when Marx started criticizing Russian government because Germany was scared of building issues with their powerful neighbors. Marx later moved to Paris and discovered another group of free thinkers there but this time the economic idea of the Comte de Saint-Simson was centered. Saint-Simson thinks a person’s economic condition controls history and that is what builds a class conflict. He was mostly interested in the bourgeoisie, which means a

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