Marx's Theory Of Alienation

1914 Words 8 Pages
The theory of alienation is ‘the intellectual construct in which Marx displays the devastating effect of capitalist production on human beings, on their physical and mental states and on the social processes of which they are a part’ (Ollman, 1996). Marx’s theory is based on the observation that within the capitalist mode of production, workers invariably lose determination of their lives by being deprived of the right to regard themselves as the director of their actions. Alienation refers to the social alienation of people from aspects of their human nature and can be defined as a condition whereby individuals are governed by institutes of their own creation in capitalist society such as; religion, the state and economy, all of which are …show more content…
This arises where ‘alienated labour tears the object of his production away from the man…tears away from him his species-life…and transforms his advantage over the animal into the disadvantage that his inorganic body, nature, is taken away from him’ (Marx, 1983: 140), and so they are deprived of social relationships, which may result in a notion of ‘anomie’ (Durkheim), due to the lack of social integration. Very relevant to todays society, anomie, therefore, is a ‘by product of rapid social change’ (Durkheim 1897) and the ‘adaptive response of an individual in an open stratification system’ (Merton …show more content…
Late modernist and Marxist theorist Harvey highlights the social and economic changes since the 1970s and identifies the decline in the traditional manufacturing industry. He states that the capitalist ‘fat cats’ have adapted to the new economy that has developed which allows them to overcome these obstacles in order to preserve profit. When referring to the four modes of alienation, for example, the ‘fat cats’ can transport their money into less economically developed countries to endure the safety and security of their wealth. Similar to Box, companies have managed to overcome obstacles as due to flexible accumulation and production of goods in third world countries, allows them to increase market value and maximise profits. With reference to Bonger, ‘capitalism is characterised by a dog eat dog society’ (1969) in which greed and selfishness of the individual is encouraged. Thus globalisation has allowed companies to overcome obstacles such as Health and Safety regulations by relocating their bases of production. However, Harvey notes that governments have ben disempowered by this globalised world and they are dependent on other EU countries and laws, which ultimately affect British

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