John Locke's Change In The Declaration Of Independence

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When the Second Continental Congress first convened in 1775, they began to address the grievances the First Congress had submitted to King George and to which there had been no reply. They established the Continental Army and the national currency, passed acts to allow colonial ships to outfit themselves for war, opened ports to foreign trade and established local governments. By 1776 it was apparent to nearly all of the representatives that independence from England was inevitable. The 1876 Currier & Ives painting of the Committee of Five, commissioned to celebrate the centennial of the Declaration of Independence, portrays the members of the original group of delegates selected by the Second Continental Congress at work drafting the document …show more content…
Locke’s writings also stated that government was a social issue whereby individuals should define a government that would protect their three inalienable rights: life, liberty and property. This rebuked the thought that political authority was a God given right as was the case of the English monarchy . Jefferson, Franklin and Adams all took these views to the table with them when assigned the task to define independence and self-government. Many of Jefferson’s earlier writings, including those drafted for the Virginia representatives, expressed the Locke mindset. In Jefferson’s original draft of the Declaration he included a section that rebuked slavery showing a clear acceptance of Locke’s essays and ideas. Only the pragmatic Adams would later note that the full body of the Continental Congress would be unwilling to ratify the document with that original …show more content…
Passing Virginia Representative Richard Henry Lee’s Resolution for Independence on July 2nd, the Congress considered the Declaration until July 4th when the modified original document was accepted. It was then engrossed, or written in substantive handwriting and printed, and finally signed by most delegates on August 2nd. The contribution of the Committee of Five, lead by Jefferson, Adams and Franklin became the defining point in history where rhetoric for independence ended and the true battle to attain freedom

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