Death Capote Rhetorical Analysis Essay

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When writing this novel, Capote's goal was to not only inform the readers about the murders, but also to provide insight into the murders and create an overall tone of suspense within the novel. In his writing, he attempted to show what the murderers were thinking, as well as imply different motives. One way he achieves his goal is through the way he structures his novel. Creating a tone of suspense in a story where the outcome is already known is difficult. In Capote's novel, he uses situational irony to build suspense throughout the story. He does this, despite the reader's knowledge of the ultimate ending of the novel, and the fact that the killers were caught by the authorities. Capote also organised his novel into a basic narrative …show more content…
Throughout the novel, the author attempts to imply certain motives for the murders, many of which were never considered before his writing.
Audience: The author's intended audience are all readers who are interested in this particular genre. This intended audience greatly shapes the way capote tells the story of these murders. Instead of simply creating an insipid chronological list of the events that unfolded, he masterfully crafted the story in a both intriguing and suspenseful manner, which was best suited for his target audience.
Logos: In his novel, the author utilizes logos to establish a logical order of events within the story. One way he does this is by using factual information within the book, such as including the real dates, names and locations of these events.
Pathos:Throughout the novel it is evident that the author attempts to make use of pathos in his writing. One example is in his gruesome description of the murders, where he attempts to invoke a sense of pity toward the victims, as well as emphasize the gruesome nature of such
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One of these allusions is his writing of the the death penalty, which was a topic of debate even at the time of the murders. The author doesn't hide his personal views on this topic very well, as he emphasizes the unfair nature of their trial. This emphasis serves to demonstrate how juries are often determined to give the death penalty, even before trial: a bias that creates an unfair system that grants the jury the power of choosing one's ultimate fate, despite whether or not their decision is truly just. The authors allusion, however subtle, reflects on his personal belief about capital punishment. The author makes many other uses of outside sources throughout his writing, but his allusion to capital punishment is perhaps his most significant. As it further reveals Capote's view on the

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