Jean Piaget's Cognitive Development Stages

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Imagine, growing up in the late 1800’s; witnessing the forefront of both science and psychology. Although, life seems different back then it was in fact similar to current events today. Scientists of this exciting era were continually making new discoveries, and constructing theories. Without the discoveries of scientists in the beginning of psychology, our world would today would be immensely different. Notably, throughout history many individuals have made amazing contributions to the field of psychology. This paper will study one of those amazing individuals, scientist, Jean Piaget; and his theories on the cognitive development stages.
Jean Piaget was born August 9th, 1896 in Neuchâtel (Switzerland). The oldest child of Arthur Piaget,
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Piaget believed that this stage occurred during the ages of two to seven years old. The first part of the phase occurs between two to four years of age, where the child begins speaking more. usually egocentric, and completely related to their abilities. During this phase they are also able to think abstractly about things without the object being presented (Child Development, 2011). The phase is important because the child begins to see the world from a different point of view, which leads us to the second part of the phase occurring usually between four to seven years; this is when the child becomes more social and less self-absorbed. They look at things from their own point of view, able to understand different points of views when people interact with them (Santrock, 2004). The next stage in Piaget’s theories of development is the period of concrete operations, this phase occurs during years seven through twelve. This period examines the child’s ability to organize logical thought, and has the ability to perform multiple tasks, and put objects into order, the child is able to perform problem solving skills (Child Development, …show more content…
During this stage children typically use problem solving skills to perform tasks that require logic. During this stage the child is considered to be less egocentric, unlike the previous stages; the child is able to function without craving as much attention. The concrete operations involves children being able to classify and understand cause and effect relationships, as well as being able to become proficient in mathematics and science (Eggen, P). Finally, the last stage is the formal operations stage; this is from eleven on to adulthood. As adolescents enter this stage they form the ability to think abstractly, in order to think and determine things by a higher power of reasoning (McLeod, S.A). Furthermore, thinking becomes less tied to the child’s reality they are able to think about things without actually experiencing

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