Interventions And Causes Of Antisocial Personality Disorder

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Antisocial Personality Disorder
In this paper I am going to go over the symptoms one can have when diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder, as well as the causes and risk factors of this particular disorder. I will also briefly talk about possible Interventions and issues that can arise in intervention. The few things that counselors should know about the individuals who are diagnosed with APD and what to watch out for when it comes to dealing with patients with APD.
The many symptoms can include: having a major neglect for what is right and what is wrong. Being dishonest to others and persistently lying. Acting disrespectfully towards others as well as violating the rights of others. One can show severe irritability, hostility, agitation
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Which can cause them to have a hard time with family, work and school.
Some of the possible causes are through “Personality which is the combination of thoughts, emotions and behaviors that is what makes everyone unique. It 's the way people view, understand and relate to the outside world, as well as how they see themselves. Personality forms during childhood, shaped through an interaction of inherited tendencies and environmental factors.” Life situations can trigger the development of antisocial personality disorder. Genes can also allow you to be vulnerable to developing this disorder. Also during brain development, it can result in changing the way the brain functions.
There are a few risk factors that can increase the risk of developing antisocial personality disorder. Which include having a family history of antisocial personality disorder or another personality disorder as well as any other mental illness. Another risk factor could include having been exposed to abuse and child neglect during childhood and having an unstable, violent or a chaotic family during childhood. According to SAMSHA Tip 42 there are two vital features of antisocial personality disorder including a persistent disregard and violation of the rights of others as I said before and the inability to “form meaningful
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A majority of substance abuse treatment is targeted to those with APD and treatment has actually been quite effective for those with antisocial personality disorder. A majority of users are not actually sociopathic except as a result of their addiction. Again furthermost people who are diagnosed with APD are not psychopaths just people who use intimidation, manipulation and violence to use others to satisfy their own wants and needs. It is also common for those who have antisocial personality disorder to use more than two substances in a pattern including marijuana, alcohol, cocaine heroin and methamphetamine. Some people with APD also sometimes get excited by the illegal drug culture, thereby for those who are more effective can limit themselves to the exploitative behaviors where they are not vulnerable to criminal

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