Hitchcock International Style Essay

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Question 4
The term “international style” was first used by Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock, at the “Modern Architecture: International Exhibition” in 1932 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The term was used to define an emerging style of architecture which emerged in the 1920s, and was characterised by radically simplified geometry and free from all constraints of tradition, Tietz (1999). After the First World War, there was an urgent need to address the problem of homelessness. There was also an increasing drive to create a more relevant architecture that was fueled by social purpose, as opposed to the overly ornamented, irrational, and out dated architecture that reigned throughout the 19th century, Ching (2007). The works of Le Corbusier, Peit Mondrian, De Stijl movement in the Netherlands, and the Bauhaus in German, contructivists in the Soviet union, pioneered the creation of an authentic, simple style of architecture that empasised; interpenetrating volumes, standardised elements, and renunciation of ornamentation Kostof (1999). The result was a new style of architecture identified by its; ribbon windows, simple ¬¬colors and geometry, screen walls, flat roofs, and nonstructural partition walls Tietz (1999). Some of the first buildings to mark the age of the
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From there, it’s clear that critical regionalism was just as against the domination of hegemonic powers and superficial nationalism in the 19th as was International Style architecture. Therefore both International Style architecture and Critical Regionalism profoundly advocated for the use of modern technologies in architecture, with the later emphasising that these be used with the payment of extra attention to

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