Ibiture And Ambition In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, portrays a story of a man that goes by the name of Victor Frankenstein, who stumbles across an idea to create life. In this process, he is unknowingly setting himself up for his own demise as his ambition controls him. In the end, Frankenstein and his creation, the monster, ultimately fail and it is their ambition that eventually leads them to their downfall. Frankenstein is too caught up in his ambition that it controls him and affects him in every way possible. For example, Frankenstein displays his ambition and what he what he’s been doing towards it, “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of
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In this quote, Frankenstein expresses his dedication for his ambition, while having his mind is set on how he is going to soon turn his ambition into a reality. He describes how his ambition to research and attempt to create life drains him of his health. But, what he does not realize is that focusing all of his time on his goal essentially blinds him from what he is really doing. His feelings of ambition are so strong that it controls him and his actions; in a way his ambition brainwashes him. As being the most ambitious man, all he was doing was reading, studying, then later creating. These actions of his represents the first mistake of his downfall. As said in the quote, “But now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished… and disgust filled my heart,” from this quote, there is a sense of foreshadowing towards Frankenstein. This …show more content…
Never will I give up my search until he or I perish…” (195). This quote, displays Frankenstein’s lust for the killing the monster. Knowing the deaths of just about everyone he knows and loves, his ambition is to simply confront and kill the monster. But, due to his blindness and stubbornness, Frankenstein’s sense of realization fails him, as he plans to deal with the monster. He devotes himself onto finding the monster, but never gets around doing so because he cannot find the monster. And so, his ambition drags him down to his own demise as he was again, too caught up on trying to find the monster. This ambition emerges after he denies to tend to the monster, and with this, he startles the monster and helps persuade him to do such actions to Frankenstein’s friends and family. Frankenstein should have been more keen to realize the snowball effect he causes that tramples over him in the end. This quote also displays Frankensteins late reaction to the monster’s doings. This ambition is not possible if it were not for his previous ambition, in which he acts upon wrongly. These 2 ambitions, especially his first one help leads him into a path to his downfall as he is unresponsive at most times and too caught up in the moment of

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