Fatal Deception In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Fatal Deception in Frankenstein
Knowledge is a powerful weapon that can help or destroy a person; plunging them into darkness.From the start Victor was a humble, shy young man. However, his awestruck interest with philosophers and their ideas later lead to a dark path. He created his own deception without trying and fell into his own invisible barrier. He realized far too late what was happening until it was at the point of no return,where only destruction laid. His alter-ego, obsessions control, illusion, and rejection lead to creating his own self deception and realizing far too late.Throughout the story Victor slowly misinterprets aspects of his mind that ultimately lead to failure.The Novel ,written by Mary shelley, conceives the idea
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Frankenstein did not see how dominant and strong his thirst for knowledge was, later leaving this solitary idea to shape his identity,”chord after chord was sounded, and soon my mind was filled with one thought, one conception, one purpose” (Shelly 53). It was simple at first,”it was the secret of heaven and earth that i desire learn…”,however, morphing into “Natural philosophy is the genius that had regulated my fate” (Shelly 39). He didn't know what to become so he let his ideas regulate his life causing him to lose control of himself. He put himself in a different level from others claiming that he believed he was“...totally unfitted for the company of strangers (shelly 48). He was not only pushing people away from him but also salvation at its finest form. He set a path before him closing the doors that could save him from his unconsciously dangerous …show more content…
He believed that the knowledge he so desperately sought after was his without consequence, but he was sadly mistaken. The secret that he treasured so much was his ultimate end, for no human should be able to wield and posses such information without the consequences of science. “Darkness had no effect upon my fancy...:”, the reason being that without know, it was already ingrained in him (shelly 58).This one necessary idea lead victor to deprive himself “...of health and rest” (shelly 67). Frankenstein was so obsessed with creating a being that he didn't care about the changes that came his way. Not only was he risking himself mentally but also physically. At this point he would sacrifice anything and anyone to achieve his ambition. Just as Dr. warren stated “ we fool ourselves into believing things that are false and we refuse to believe things that are the truth” (Warren). A sweet lie is always easier to ingest rather than a bitter

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