Exile And Rejection In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In regards to the themes of exile and rejection in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, it is evident that the seclusion of each narrator is self-inflicted through the concept of hamartia. In Frankenstein’s case, he reflects the idea of hubris, in which his extreme narcissism leads to the separation and detachment between himself and his loved ones. On the other hand, the rejection of the creature arises from the belief that he is a monster who is also entitled to love. Lastly, Walton’s fatal flaw is his ambitious search for glory where his thirst for the power that accompanies accomplishment separates him from his family, thus leading to their rejection of him. This essay will argue the extent to which the three narrators’ excessive pride brings about …show more content…
The creature’s hamartia stems from the fact that he is a character of entitled narcissism. Despite the creature’s hatred for his own appearance, he blames his “cursed creator” (149) for all his adversities such as his rejection from the De Lacey family and his loneliness. When the creature exiles himself from the De Lacey cabin, he “declare[s] everlasting war against… him who had formed [the creature], …show more content…
Frankenstein strives to create “a new species [that] would bless [him] as its creator and source” (80). His God-Complex is so apparent that he feels that his creations would “owe their being to [him]” (80). However, his aspirations take priority over his loved ones because he “could not tear [his] thoughts from [his] employment” (82). This proves his selfishness that contributes to the self-sabotage present within his character. Unknowingly, Frankenstein’s obsession with being worshipped by a new species distances him from those who care for him, specifically his father, Clerval and Elizabeth. Initially, Victor’s devotion to natural philosophy causes him to ignore his father’s wishes to “hear regularly” from him. With the presence of a physical barrier between himself and his father, Frankenstein’s prioritization of work over contacting his family emphasizes and leads to their separation. Later, his abandonment of Clerval in order to “finish his work in solitude” (172) inevitably results in the death of his dearest friend. It was Victor’s pride that made him hide the reality of his creature from Clerval. The reader can infer that Victor likely does this to protect his ego as he is unwilling to admit that the consequences of his misguided decisions. Ultimately, Frankenstein protects Clerval’s

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