Hurricanes Essay

994 Words 4 Pages
A hurricane, by definition, is a tropical cyclone with strong winds spiraling inward and upward and speeds ranging from 75 mph to 200 mph. Hurricanes emerge from the Atlantic basin, which consists of the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, the northeastern Pacific Ocean, and, less often, the central north Pacific Ocean. Most hurricanes follow a similar cycle of development. Some may run their course in as little as a day or as long as a month. They weaken and are transformed into extratropical cyclones after prolonged contact with the colder ocean waters of the middle latitudes, and they rapidly decay after moving over land areas. A hurricane evolves through a life cycle from birth to death, starting with the tropical depression …show more content…
It is called a “depression” because it has low or depressed air pressure at its center. A tropical depression forms when a low pressure are is accompanied by thunderstorms that produce circular wind flow with winds below 39 mph. Once a group of thunderstorms has come together under the right atmospheric conditions for a long enough time, they may organize into a tropical depression. Lowered pressure is indicated with at least one closed isobar on a surface pressure chart. Also, the organized circulation of wind in the center of the thunderstorms is detected. This stage is the weakest form of a tropical cyclone. In the United States, the National Hurricane Center is responsible for issuing advisories upgrading or downgrading tropical activity. To gather information about the developing tropical cyclone, reconnaissance aircrafts are sent into it by the National Hurricane Center, or NHC. These aircrafts collect data like wind speeds, to aid in making classification changes. Surface data from islands, buoys, and vessels can also be used to make …show more content…
Winds in a hurricane can range from 200 mph and up to 600 mph. A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when the closed circulation becomes an eye. In the western Pacific, hurricanes are called "typhoons," and similar storms in the Indian Ocean are called "cyclones". Hurricanes are products of the Tropical Ocean and atmosphere, and are powered by heat from the sea. They are steered by the trade winds and the temperatures as well as by their own energy. Around their core, winds grow creating dangerous water conditions. Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while spawning tornadoes and producing rain storms and floods. At this point, the system is capable of causing significant

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