The Spread Of Buddhism

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Buddhism spans over 2,500 years and is filled with many interesting and different stories. Over it’s history, Buddhism has grown into a range of forms varying from an emphasis on religious rituals and the worship of deities, to rejection of both rituals and deities in favor of pure meditation. All forms of Buddhism share reverence for the teachings of the Buddha, the goal of ending suffering and the cycle of rebirth. Beginning in India, Buddhism flourished, and still remains the dominant religion in the East. Buddhism has over 360 million followers worldwide, over one million American Buddhists, and has helped spread the idea of mediation and nonviolence drastically. Buddhists do not believe that this world is created or ruled by a God. Buddhism …show more content…
The noble consists of the truth of suffering, truth of the cause of suffering, the truth of end of suffering, and the truth of the path that frees us from suffering. Many translate the first noble truth as “life is suffering”. The Buddha taught that before one can understand life and death, one must understand the self. The second noble truth teaches that cravings and self-centeredness is the cause of suffering. According to The Buddha, never remaining satisfied is a result from ignorance of the self. The third noble truth is taught to show that diligent practice will put an end to self-centered cravings. Simply believing in The Truths will not dissipate ones self-centeredness. Through contemplation, observation, and investigation of The Truths for yourself. Stressing the idea of learning through experience and not just intellect has opened insights for millions of people around the …show more content…
Buddhist teachings are basically guidelines to being a decent human being and living a happy life. Not only does it have great personal benefits, but it directly helps and has positive affects on those around you. Kindness can truly change the world.
Throughout this course I have learned people handle and cope with life differently. By understanding these Zen ethics, realizing and understanding how one thinks, speaks, and acts can lead to complete self-realization. Buddhism can help develop ones moral strength through the control of negative actions and gathering positive actions for personal, mental, and spiritual growth.
This has helped me to appreciate every life challenge and each lesson that comes from them. By using ideas of Buddhism such as the Middle Way, every challenge may impact life by expanding the mind and living with balance. To some, the idea of Buddhism is not something they are open to, but this class taught me to be open to any idea. One will never truly know anything just by using intellect—personal experience is key. Without openness, one can immediately stop or shut out an experience that could minimally or even drastically change their life. Naturally, people strive to be a better version of themselves, for an improved experience and this is done by having a better understanding of ones own thoughts, feelings, and

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