Essay about History of Occupational Therapy

2639 Words May 7th, 2013 11 Pages
Final Paper Assignment
OTA 101
April 22, 2013
Reggie Thompson

Abstract

This paper is entitled “What is Occupational Therapy?” This paper will include an in depth definition and meaning of occupational therapy and over view of the profession. Where it began and who helped mold it into the current practice. Also the paper will discuss the various employment settings, the education requirements and the appropriate accreditations as well as the numerous organizations affiliated with the practice of occupational therapy.

Occupational therapy (OT) takes holistic approach rather than a reductionistic view. This allows the therapist to treat the client as a whole and not person comprised of
…show more content…
In the late 1700s and early 1800s people were becoming enlighten, which sparked social consciousness(Peloquin,1989). It was during this period that occupational therapy began to emerge. This new awareness took a closer look at how people with a mental illness were treated. Prior to this period of enlightenment the mentally ill were treated inhumane. They were treated like prisoners, chained and locked away from society and considered to be a danger. Often abused and ignored. Many believed the mentally ill were possessed by devils (Butcher, Mineka, and Hooley,2011). Cruel and inhumane behavior lead to the concept Moral Treatment, which is a belief that all people, even the most challenged are entitled to consideration and human compassion. Phillippe Pinel (a French physician, philosopher, and scholar) and Willaim Tuke (an English Quaker) began the Moral Treatment movement. They challenged society’s beliefs concerning the mentally ill. Pinel initiated “work treatment” for the insane. He believed that moral treatment meant treating one’s emotions, and using occupation as way to direct their minds away from emotional disturbances. Pinel incorporated literature, music, physical exercise and work as away to help with emotional stress, and would improve a person’s ability to perform daily activities. During this time William Tuke was also equally dissatisfied with the treatment of the mentally ill. Tuke believed they should be treated with

Related Documents