Japanese Healthcare System

1976 Words 8 Pages
With such an effective, comprehensive healthcare system being utilized in Japan, there are certain salient features that make their healthcare system distinctive and noticeable. One primary quality that sets Japan’s universal healthcare program apart from other nations is the specific structure and effectiveness of their public health insurance system and the in-depth role that the government plays in the assembly and implementation of this unique operation. The three insurance plans, the EHI, NHI, and the HISE, which have been carefully implemented and integrated into the Japanese culture, have all been meticulously formed to assist the diverse needs of Japan’s economic complexities, as well as its heterogeneous patient populations. …show more content…
Although the introduction and integration of the Affordable Care Act has enforced the mandatory registration of healthcare insurance to its citizens in the United States, a robust healthcare system in Japan has been conveniently and efficiently provided to all of its citizens. This comprehensive system promotes a more reasonable monetary disbursement payment structure, protecting its patient populations from unbalanced healthcare costs that can ultimately affect ones willingness to seek out and accept any necessary care. Although the United States may desire to move its medical industry towards the direction of a more socialist healthcare system, while also promoting more preventative means, the Japanese have already placed an active, inherent emphasis on this preventative methodology, implementing the necessary measures, which have thoroughly, permeated the psyche of their culture for some …show more content…
Although, Japan’s healthcare populations yield the highest life expectancy rate, reflect the lowest infant mortality, the medical care is unbelievably cheap, efficient and comprehensive, the Japanese still feel the need to heavily utilize the services and resources available to them at an alarming rate. The result of this easily accessible medical care has made Japan the highest consumer of health care in the world. The average citizen in Japan visits a physician 14.5 times a year, which is three times the amount an individual would visit a doctor in the United States. Also, the Japanese have an inherent fascination with medical technology, and in turn, get three times the amount of CAT scans that are done in the United States, as well as twice the amount of MRI scans that are performed. Furthermore, the average stay in a hospital for a patient is thirty-six nights, compared to that of six nights in the United States. Finally, when giving birth, women in Japan find it necessary to remain in the hospital with their baby for up to ten days, a week longer than new mothers in the United States (Reid,

Related Documents