Greatness Of A Great Movie Analysis

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Achieving Greatness: The Definition of a Great Film And the Academy Award for Best Picture goes to…The Artist! The silent film also won three other awards at this year’s Oscars; add those awards to the wide praise the movie received from both critics and viewers, and a strong case can be made in calling The Artist a great movie. However, at the time of its nomination, The Artist had only grossed about $12 million; compare that to critical flop Transformers: Dark of the Moon, which grossed over $350 million. If huge budgets, huge profits, hugely famous actors, and huge amounts of special effects do not necessarily make a great movie, what does? Most great movies start with a great script—they have interesting plots that provoke thought and …show more content…
Greatness in films can be measured in accordance to dramatic awards and critical praise—which Dean Keith Simonton, a professor of psychology at UC Davis, argues are one and the same—as well as acclaim over time (Simonton). Time is an interesting factor in the greatness of a film; it reveals the iconicity and cultural significance of a movie. At the time of its release, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho received very mixed reviews. One critic even labeled it “melodramatic” and called its performances “fair” (Crowther). And, although nominated, Psycho did not win a single Academy Award. Fifty years later, Psycho is arguably the most iconic horror film of all time. RottenTomatoes.com gives it a nearly-perfect 99%. Audiences enjoy this film in droves, from 1960 to 2012, because of its very intriguing story. Psycho’s plot certainly keeps the viewer on his toes: the film’s biggest star is murdered off very early in the movie, …show more content…
Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is a great example of this. The film moves slowly, dialogue is sparse, and the ending provides anything but closure to the viewer. Even so, 2001 only gets better upon reviewing, because the copious amount of detail and overwhelming ambiguity in the storyline and its construction allow the viewer to see and experience something new each time. A movie that could exist as simply a festival of impressive images flashing across the screen with a lazy viewer becomes, when watched actively, an intense, philosophical, and open-ended masterpiece. A more recent example of a thought-demanding film is Christopher Nolan’s Memento. Nolan presents his story in a nonlinear perspective, moving backwards in one storyline and forward in another. In doing so, the film puts the viewer in a similar situation as the amnesiac main character. Chris Nashawaty of Entertainment Weekly called Memento “one of those jigsaw puzzles whose pieces snap together more tightly with each viewing”. More often than not, a person watching a great film cannot simply lean back and relax. The movie draws in every ounce of focus and

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