Gender Arrangements In Elementary Schools

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Concepts The articles “Women and Education” by Michelle Webber, and “Girls and Boys Together…but Mostly Apart: Gender Arrangements in Elementary Schools” by Barrie Thorne both review gender separation arranged particularly in institutions. Michelle Webber explains, through the curriculum taught by teachers in school, forms of masculinity and femininity are portrayed according to the dominant ideals (Webber, 2010, p. 251). In other words, students are taught how to act through social constructions of “hegemonic masculinity” and “emphasized femininity”. Both concepts are seen as stereotypical views, which arrive from the social and dominant assertion of how a gender is supposed to be achieved. According to Webber, teachers tend to “correct” …show more content…
249). Emphasized femininity in education is portrayed by the behaviour young girls are seemingly to be taught, as teachers award girl students by their abilities to act as a “sweetheart”, too have the “cutest personality” as well as achieve the “best manners” (Webber, 2010, p. 251). The expectation for young girls to act “feministic” hides the important trait of intelligence and focuses more upon appearance, submissive behaviour and fragility. Hegemonic masculinity is shown through young boys being interested in activities which compliment their physical abilities as well as their powerful minds. Webber’s evidence of hegemonic masculinity showcases teacher’s influence on young boys to get more involved in studies, which consequently allows boys to achieve their social status as they excel their dominate characteristic of masculinity. In Barrie Thorne’s article, children mostly follow the “two worlds” model which influences students to pursue sex segregation (Thorne, 2009, p. 176). Thorne’s concept of “two worlds” is similar to the sex/gender binary system theory, which creates a separation between masculinity and femininity (Thorne, 2009, p. 176).Usually, when teachers address students as young “boys” and “girls”, the segregation between two sex categories is developed as a normative standard (Throne, …show more content…
In regards to Webber’s article, historically, boys and girls attended same schools but sat separately in the classrooms, in addition separation was also included in the curriculum (Webber, 2010, p. 250). Furthermore, the segregation between the two genders in schools taught students different skills, information and ideology, which then lead students to different career paths. According to Webber, boy students were taught and prepared for careers as doctors or engineers, where young girls were prepared to become mothers, and at some extent elementary school teachers (Webber, 2010, p. 249). Boy and girl students’ unequal distribution of education is considered important to observe, since it is problematic, because of power hierarchy. Young boys receiving higher education in schools are predominantly given more opportunity for higher status. In connection to the division of labour, and the representation of power hierarchies, Webber indicates even when there are high rates of women graduating in increasing numbers, women continue to earn much less in the workplace in comparison to men (Webber, 2010, p.155). Moreover, education in Canada has represented a great amount of inequality; the idea of higher education for boys makes young girls learn they are unimportant as a gender (Webber, 2010, p.

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