Femininity Vs Feminism

Great Essays
Feminism and femininity seem to be opposites in the cultural landscape of the United States of America. In popular culture, feminism can be interpreted in two different ways: the definitive interpretation and the social interpretation. Feminism as definition is “the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes” (Merriam-Webster). The definitive interpretation of feminism is what it actually is, a movement of gender equality. Socially, feminism can be synonymous to misandry and is the belief that women want to rule over men. Those two definitions juxtapose the definition of femininity, which is “the quality or nature of the female sex” (Merriam-Webster). Unlike feminism, femininity is very broad because of its fluidity. …show more content…
This wave occurred throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth century. The feminists at the time were called “suffragettes” because their goal was to gain voting rights for women. The first few notable feminists include: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, and Ida B. Wells. These women were extremely important to the feminist movement because they were persistent. They began the movement of equality in the United States of America. As activists, they fought for the rights of all the women living this country today. With their persistence and passion for women’s rights, the Nineteenth Amendment was added to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. Along with gaining women’s suffrage, women also gained the right to execute wills, to own and manage property in their own name, and to patent (Olsen 209). Not only this, but also more opportunities for women were available with co-educational schools and the first female medical doctor, Elizabeth Blackwell, which eventual lead the admission of female members into the American Medical Association in 1915 (Olsen 199). Among these feats, a convention took place in Seneca Falls, New York. The Seneca Falls Convention was the birthplace of the “Declaration of Sentiments,” which listed the grievances of U.S. women (Olsen 123 – 24, 217). The “Declaration of Sentiments” not only showed that women in the United States were …show more content…
It started in the mid-2000s and with the rise of “social justice warriors,” feminism is more prevalent now than ever before. Social justice warriors are found online to spread feminist values throughout the World Wide Web. There are forums and discussion boards where feminists can gather to call out sexist media and argue to have it removed. The more radical fourth-waver have also been called “feminazis” for their overbearing presence of shoving their beliefs down others throats. Because of the radical fourth-wave feminists, there are common misconceptions about feminism and what being a feminist actually is about. Feminism gets to be misinterpreted as misandry, which makes feminists conducers to hate. Feminists, in this lens, are bra burning, men hating, non-makeup wearers who are usually lesbians. But this is wrong. It is horrible to generalize, which is part of the huge movement. It’s no longer just about women’s rights, but also about gay rights and transgendered rights and non-gender binary rights. Feminism has become redefined as an inclusive movement for all types of

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