Federalist Nation Essay

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Attention all Americans! The time has come to band together become a federalist nation. Help us develop ideas to improve our Articles of Confederation. We need to establish a cooperative government in order to allow all our citizens and states proper representation in our country. Our new federal government must be strong and powerful protecting all our communities and states. We must be able to offer a way to provide financial security, protection of freedom, success of commerce, and establish a strong congress to create our laws. A strong military is needed to achieve our goals of a powerful country. This way our people will be safe, protected and free.
As of now we have a weak national government and this needs to change immediately. If
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We have come to realize that we need away to generate our own revenue and not have to ask the states for money. If we have their own revenue, we could create fiscal policy about government spending and revenue collection. For example, if the economy needed a boost, the government could spend more. If the people needed more disposal income, they could lower taxes. We believe that a central bank is necessary for a well running government. This would help regulate the supply of money and control interest rates. If the economy needed more money to help stimulate it, the government could produce more and spend more or they could provide more loans. If we listen to Alexander Hamilton we can have a great national banking system and a thriving …show more content…
Anti-Federalist wanted taxes done at the state level where it would be controlled by the people and then each state can determine how their money would be best spent. Under the Anti-Federalist view, it is possible that some states would be successful but not all states, as a whole would be. When too many states are not succeeding economically, the country will have major issues. George mason is very against the national government having control of the taxes but without it our economy will not be able to thrive. So if every state was following a fiscal and monetary policy at the federal level, there is a greater chance that all the states will be successful

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