Piaget Developmental Case Study

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1. What is meant by the plasticity of the brain?
• When it comes to plasticity it means the tendency of new parts of the brain to take up the functions of injured parts. This means if they were to get injured in the part of the brain that controls language the results are that they will regain the ability to talk, this takes effect on kids of two to three years of age and then gradually declines. Whereas adults will lose the ability to talk.
2. How do gross motor skills differ from fine motor skills? What developments do we see in these skills during early childhood?
• Gross motor skills differ from fine motor skills because gross motor skills are skills that involve large muscles used in locomotion. This happens at about age three, children
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Sleep terrors are more severe dreams that we refer as nightmares, nightmares take place during lighter rapid-eye-movement sleep where “80% of normal dreams occur. Whereas sleep terrors happen when they are in deep sleep. Sleepwalking or somnambulism are more common in children than adults, they happen during deep sleep, ages three and eight.
4. Describe the characteristics of a child in Piaget 's preoperational stage. Be specific about the details and terms.
• Symbolic thought is the preoperational thought is characterized by the use of symbols to represent objects and to find the relationship among them. Children draw symbols of objects, people, and events in children’s lives.
• Symbolic or pretend play, which is play in which children make believe that objects and toys are other than what they are. In this stage, kids try to make believe that they are performing familiar activities such as, “sleeping or feeding
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What is scaffolding? How is it related to the zone of proximal development? Give an example to illustrate the concepts.
• Scaffolding is temporary cognitive structures or methods of solving problems that help the child as he or she learns to function independently. It relates to the zone of proximal development because the child develops cognitive skills as a function of working with more skilled people. An example if the zone of proximal development is if the child doesn’t understand certain task they will look at the person who happens to know more this person is always the parent. An example of scaffolding is when a child is being taught math, for example, they give the child the tool to learn it but they are then left alone to do the task by themselves.
6. What is overregularization? When and why does it occur?
• Overregularization is the application of regular grammatical rules for forming inflections to irregular verbs and nouns. This occurs at young ages because they tend to apply these rules rather strictly. This happens because it teaches children to learn be aware of the syntactic rules of reforming the past tense and plurals in

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