Kantian Ethical Theory

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Assignment 5
The two major ethics theories that attempt to justify and specify moral principles and moral rules are Kantian deontological ethics and Utilitarian ethics. The Kantian deontological ethics takes a position that justifies the goodness of actions based on the action’s devotion to the set rules and principles (Wolff 158). It is a duty based ethics because the set rules bind individuals to their normal duties and as such the consequences do not matter but instead compliance is what matters. In fact, it is argued that people must act from duty and thus it is not the consequences that make the actions wrong but rather the motives of a person who launches an action. Contrary to Kantian deontological ethics, Utilitarian ethics takes an
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In my understanding, it is true that ethics of what is right or wrong varies depending on an individual’s upbringing, and therefore, there are no moral absolutes, but morals are dependent on social norms. The strengths of this philosophy are that it is a practical moral philosophy which has respect for societies hence embracing peace and harmony. The problems with ethical relativism are that it fails to embrace universal moral values as they sometimes conflict because cultures are diverse and differ from society to society.
Virtual ethics is character based rather than action person, and, therefore, it focuses on the moral character of an individual executing an action and overlooks on the rules, duties and consequences of that specific action (Wolff 170). The three best examples of feminist critiques of the ethical theory include, first that the theories focus solely on men’s perspective, secondly, women are depicted as being ethically immature hence don’t play many roles in defining morality. Lastly, traditional ethical theories embrace only on masculine cultural traits and eliminate focuses a little on feminine cultural

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