Kantianism: The Moral Theory Of Utilitarianism

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The moral theory of Kantianism deals generally with the basic of determining the fundamental principles of morals in life. The first main part of Kantianism is the qualification of will for, “Nothing can possible be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good, without qualification, except a Good Will” (85). With that being said, Kant is stating, attributes that an individual may be capable of having desirable traits such as intelligence. But the way a person makes use of this gift constitutes their character. For someone of ill-will could perhaps turn something of good character into something that is not in fact good and use it immorally. No the understanding of a good will is good not because the effects the good …show more content…
The main focus of utilitarianisms is to maximize the overall happiness for everyone considering, doing our utmost to increase overall utility. For actions are right in proportion as they tend to further promote happiness, and wrong if they tend to bring the reverse of happiness. However, happiness has a specific meaning that is, “pleasure, and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain, and the privation of pleasure” (82). A further description of the utilitarian theory is that it assumes that we can indeed make moral judgments, have moral disagreements, and therefore be mistaken in our moral beliefs. Granted that our moral beliefs, and provide supporting reasons for our moral …show more content…
Specifically in a utilitarian calculation on how to act. Now not just human pleasure, but animal pain and pleasure which is relatively the same. However, other utilitarians can argue that the benefits used from using the animals generate a great net balance of happiness over pain. So take into consideration that the animals do suffer sure. But the benefits yielding to mankind from that suffering could perhaps from a sense overwhelm and outweigh the harm posed to them. So that it would be the utilitarian moral choice to used animal for human purposes. With that being said the human purpose that would be most notably the clearest case for animal experimentation would be for medical purpose. For medical experimentation could be capable of yielding great benefits to mankind in terms of medical technology. For these advances in technology could create so much human happiness and positive welfare that it would be worth the cost to the animals. Or another argument could be the pleasures of consuming the meat could generate so much human pleasure it could not possibly be outweighed by the pain to the animal. However, this is a weaker argument, since the pain to the animals is substantial to the pleasure of

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