Analysis Of The Hippocratic Oath

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The Hippocratic oath begins with outright invocation of the gods; the first line of the oath is “I swear by Apollo the healer” (Chadwick and Mann). The close relation between gods and medicine continue as the oath goes on. Following the oath was entering into a covenant with gods and deviating from it would risk divine retribution. In the oath, Hippocrates reveals that the medical practices and religion go hand in hand in the ancient Greek society. However, in modern society medical practices and religion clash. For example, with issues like abortion, assisted suicide and practices in the war zone.
In the Hippocratic oath a physician is not allowed to do abortion on a women. They believe that abortion is killing a life and physicians are not to do it. In the modern- day society abortion is performed and women
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Despite the ways our values clash with the medical field the oath is a good set of guidelines for physicians to follow. We hope that the values on how to interact with patients are at the heart of every physician. Although it references Greek gods there is value in the oath. Even if the religious beliefs are different the value of how doctors are supposed to treat patients is the same. The oath helps the physicians to have a healthy doctor patient relationship and reduce health disparities. Although the oath started mainly for the physicians of the ancient Greek society the oath is widely spread among the world. The oath was adapted and made more acceptable in the modern world while keeping the values of what makes a good physician. Medical schools in the United States of America require that a medical student take the modern version of the oath before they start studying to be a physician. The oath still in some form is within the heart of all

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