Resolving Ethical Dilemmas In Health Care

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Dilemma Description Ethical dilemma is a very serious and complicated issue to deal with in the health care environment because it had to deal with human beings, especially life and death. Ethical dilemma becomes an issue when patient, family members, and health care providers have different views or opinions regarding medical care. Sometimes, health care providers believe that a medically challenged or disabled patient will have such a terrible quality of life, that he or she would not want to live. While the family may not agree, wants to keep a loved one alive, believing a patient with the disability still wants to live. Culture, religion and family orientation plays some important roles in ethical dilemma. Some religions are against …show more content…
The principle of Autonomy, Beneficence, and nonmalefience are applicable to this situation. The principle of autonomy states that a patient has the right to self-governing. Health care provider must respect and support a person medical decision and wishes. Nonmalefience is an ethical principle that instruct a healthcare provider not to intentional inflict harm or hurt a person. In this modern time, this principle applies in using technology to prolong a person ‘s life, while it is obvious such treatment would not produce a good result.
Another principle of ethic Beneficence promoting good health for patients. This principle urges health care workers to do good, prevent harm and ensure patients well-beings are priority, at same time be considerate, respect patient’s wants and desire. ( ANA,.2015)

Relating Principles to the
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The patient ends up unresponsive and brain dead. However, the patient’s family were upset and angry when the healthcare providers were planning to remove ventilator/life support to cause the patient to die. Thus, the healthcare provider holds on and did further interview, got the ethical committee to step in resolving the issue with the patient’s family. The ethic committee members identify and interpret the risk involved in brain dead and probability of patient having to recover. In this situation, an expected outcome is for the patient’s family to have detailed information, resources they needed and clarity about their concerns which would allow them to make the best decision for their child’s health and well-being. Fortunately, the family sued the hospital and seek the help of the court to keep her on life support and then, transferred to another hospital in New Jersey where she is currently

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