Essay On Serial Crime

1425 Words 6 Pages
to outline how criminal behavior is more likely in certain contexts. The existence of a possible, accessible victim, a motivated offender, and a lack of competent guardianship combine to create an opportunity structure (Haggerty 2009). They argue that crime and violence are sociogenic; poverty, unemployment, societally blocked means to legitimate ends may all contribute to someone’s entrance into crime (Holmes and Holmes 1998). Perhaps the situations that allow for sociopathy (e.g. socialization into violence in interpersonal relations) to arise contribute to an individual’s entrance into crime (Holmes and Holmes 1998). With regard to serial killing, sociologists explore contextual explanations. If there is a biological disposition, individual …show more content…
While the media is invaluable to the advancement of public literacy and understanding of distant cultures, it also feeds public appetites for the sensational, the cynical, and the horrific. It has helped along a culture of celebrity that is not always productive and is even sometimes extremely harmful. In antiquity, individuals who killed sequentially were largely working in the dark in terms of identity formation that revolved around killing others. Serial killing is predominately a media construct. Keep in mind that this is not a “cause and effect” media effect; people do not become serial killers singly due to their exposure to violence in TV or other media. The media’s influence is more indirect; it provides the basic institutional framework and the cultural context for the glorification of modern forms of serial killing. Serial killers and the media have a kind of symbiotic relationship. Serial killing interests audiences, and some, if not all, serial killers want an audience. The media want an audience, too, because audiences make them money. In addition to this, another influence of the mass media concerns how the media fosters a culture of celebrity. Rather than being shamed by having the results of their actions splashed across every news outlet, serial killers tend to revel in their celebrity and actively seek out media attention. Ted Bundy, a …show more content…
It is a Developmental Life Course Theory. The life course can be defined as a pathway through the life span depending on culture and age that affects social transitions over time. The central principle of Sampson and Laub’s theory is one of informal social control; delinquency is more likely when an individual’s bond to society is weak or broken. In addition, their theory also explores continuity and change in criminal behavior over the life course. (Laub and Allen 2000). As will be discussed later, both of these concepts are integral to the behaviors of the serial killer. The individual’s bonds with their parents are poorly formed as children so that they are weak and may be broken during adolescence (Fox, Jennings and Farrington 2015). Additionally, there are interesting patterns in the continuity of behaviors over the life course of a serial killer as well as change later in life (Fox, Jennings and Farrington

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