Ernest Hemingway's A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

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All humans have feelings of despair and worthlessness. As we mature, we have more substantial periods of worthlessness. In Ernest Hemingway’s “ A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”, we get an inside look at the relation between old age and feeling worthless. Old age promotes feelings of worthlessness. The old waiter is not rushed in his actions at the café, as he knows the struggles of the old man, and this causes him to drink alone at a bar. Old age supports the delay in critical actions. The old waiter is not rushed in his actions The old man is finally leaving the cafe and the two waiters are closing up for the night.
"’Why didn't you let him stay and drink?’ the unhurried waiter asked. They were putting up the shutters. ’It is not half-past two.’
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The old waiter does not feel worthless at the bar. The old waiter shows up at the bar and starts to feel the nothingness. “Nor can you stand before a bar with dignity although that is all that is provided for these hours. What did he fear? It was not a fear or dread, It was a nothing that he knew too well. It was all an othing and a man was a nothing too. It was only that and light was all it needed and a certain cleanness and order. Some lived in it and never felt it but he knew it all was nada y pues nada y nada y pues nada.” (Hemingway 6) The old waiter goes to the bar because he feels worthless to the café. He believes that the café is the place where the old man comes when he feels worthless, and the old waiter has same reason for drinking alone at the bar. Explain Old age creates a feeling of worthlessness. The old waiter is not rushed in his actions at the café, as he sympathizes with the old man, and this is expressed as drinking alone at a bar. As portrayed in “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”, the old waiter and old man both experienced substantial feelings of worthlessness. Each expresses it in a different manner, however the premise for their actions is the same. Both the old waiter and old man understand the need for their ‘Clean Well-Lighted Place’. They are trying to get away from the worthless

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