Erikson´s Psychosocial Theory

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Children are rapidly growing and adjusting to their society to improve the quality of their life to achieve an identity. It’s one of the most important factor in life. It’s to find their purpose in this world. In the sense it’s important for parent to recognize that children can be taught to express their emotions. At an early age children are constantly trying to establish an identity. Allowing children to freely express their feelings and experiences allows them to have empathy for others. In a sense that Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory emphasized on identity. According to Miller (2011), the main principle of life is to pursue an identity. It’s the acceptance of one’s self and their society. Throughout the child’s life, he or she is constantly …show more content…
Emotions can be challenging for children to handle. However, it is teachable. It starts with the parents. Firestone (2016) advises parents to learn how to handle their emotions because this will also inspire their children how to handles theirs (Firestone, 2016). It starts with recognition from the child, which can lead to a positive influence and help them develop a new perspective of self-awareness and mental health. Miller (2011) Erikson’s stage two stated that children at this stage develop new skills as it also opens up for new vulnerabilities (Miller, 2011, p.151). In other words, encouragement builds up the child’s confidence and independence to do things on their own but if the child is shame, it brings down the child’s self-esteem. Firestone (2016) suggest that teaching a child to be mindful can reduce levels of stress, depression and anxiety in children. Studies have shown that mindfulness can increase gray matter density in the brain, which plays a huge role in emotional regulation (Firestone, 2016). Teaching a child to be mindful creates positive emotions while reducing negative emotions. In other words, the child is able take in the critiques that will help him to become a better person. Firestone (2016) believed that it’s important for parent to restore any emotional damages that they might’ve caused and create an environment that their children can continue to make sense of their emotions and …show more content…
This also helps children to complete in finding their identity but when children are unable to complete their identification they face “identity diffusion”. This is when the child’s personality isn’t fully established and the child isn’t actively seeking to establish an identity (Miller, 2013, p.154). Identity diffusion usually occur in adolescence year in Erikson Psychosocial Stage Theory stage five. At stage five, adolescence experience social pressure and are force to take on varieties of roles. This allows them to make sense of what’s important in their life. According to Miller (2011) adolescence seek their true self through their peers and their society. It gives them the opportunities to take on new roles (Miller, 2011, p.154). These new roles give them the opportunity to explore their identity and find what it is that matters to them. Firestone (2016) believes that the conversations with parents, teachers and friends encourages [adolescence] to freely express themselves (Firestone, 2016). In other words, it gives them the opportunity to build social connections. Adolescences are able to achieve their identity through these connections from their peers and their

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