Intelligence Quotient (IQ)

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Cognitive psychology is defined as the study of higher mental processes including attention, language use, memory, perception, problem-solving, creativity, and thinking. It’s within the cognitive level of analysis of psychology that the debate of intelligence centers. Possibly the most philosophical and ethically integrated subject of psychology, I find intelligence, its evaluation, and its relationship with achievement an infatuating area to study. Since the conception of the discipline, the definition of intelligence has been widely debated; however one of the most distinctive definitions clarifies intelligence to be the capacity of the individual to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with his environment. More recent …show more content…
The attempt to define intelligence through the use of testing has been approached by nearly as many angles as the theory of intelligence itself. The single coefficient modeled approach to IQ has been in practice since Binet’s Binet - Simon scale. Since the eve of the twentieth century, despite controversy taking place primarily within the last fifty years, the concept of a general intelligence examination has remained as the most prominent and highly regarded of the intelligence examinations. Similarly, the concept of measuring emotional intelligence (EI) has proven to be one of the most controversial aspects of psychology. From the examiner to the correctness of the response, there seems to be no total consensus within the psychological community over which examination is most reliable or accurate. However, the primary measurement tool of the Mayer-Salovey model of EI, the model which this investigation shall be utilizing, is the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Constructed in cooperation with Multi-Health Systems Incorporated, the test evaluates the subject through a series of questions and tests regarding emotions. The subject is scored by the consensus of their answers with the social norms by comparison to a worldwide sample of respondents. The method …show more content…
Mayer and Peter Salovey. However, it is in Daniel Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence that the definition of EQ is solidified as “the array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance." It’s the psychometric level of analysis’s approach in the attempt to compare the interconnected abilities concerning emotion that establishes the need for the measurement of EQ. Emotional intelligence is a standard of human capacity. According to the four-branch model of emotional intelligence, the umbrella term of emotional intelligence contains four branches: managing emotions so as to attain goals; understanding emotions, emotional language, and the signals conveyed by emotions; using emotions to facilitate thinking; and perceiving emotions accurately in oneself and others. EQ tests have been developed to reflect similar methods as IQ tests. However, due to the differing ramifications of the attempt to test emotions over testable cognitive ability, finding the best method of testing is incredibly difficult. The majority of the unanimity exists because of the need to establish a test of ability. This test of ability is present in the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). The MSCEIT consists of eight tasks; two for each of the four branches of emotional intelligence. Tasks are answered making use of the Likert

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