Negative Body Image Experiment

2374 Words 10 Pages
Since the late 1800s, people of all ages have been told that thin is beautiful (Zimmerman). Negative Body image can be one of the first triggers of an eating disorder (ED) and one of the final and toughest stages of recovery. Body image is how you see yourself when you look in the mirror or picture yourself in your mind. Sexually objectified images of girls and women in advertisements are most likely to appear in men’s magazines. Yet the second most common source of such images is the advertisements in teen magazines directed at adolescent girls, says the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA). These images mold society’s opinion of the ideal body. This literature review examines the correlation between printed media’s portrayal …show more content…
Participants in the thin-ideal experiment were instructed to view forty full-page photographs from the summer 1996 issues of three mass circulation magazines: Cosmopolitan, Vogue, and Glamour. Six eligibility criteria had to be met for photographs to be used in the thin-ideal condition: (1) the ad was a full page, (2) it had to show at least ninety percent of the model’s body, (3) no other models were featured in the ad, (4) any printed material had to be at a font of fourteen or smaller, and larger print could cover the model’s body, (5) the camera angle had to focus on the model and no other product, (6) the ad could not allude to a diet product or dieting. Participants in the neutral-image experiment viewed forty advertisements not containing people, selected from the same issues of Cosmopolitan, Vogue, and Glamour. Ads for food or weight loss diets were not included. The majority of the ads included cars, make-up, jewelry, and perfume. Then they received questionnaires to explain how the advertisements made them feel (Hawkins, Richards, Granley, Stein, …show more content…
The disease can be treated effectively, and the people it afflicts can live happy and productive lives. In their study of the disease, Dr. Wayne A. Bowers and Dr. Arnold E. Andersen report that "successful treatment of anorexia is a pragmatic blend of medical management, weight restoration, psychotherapy, and, at times, pharmacotherapy” (Harmon, p. 59). Harmon describes psychotherapy as the treatment of problems by conversing with another person, or “talk therapy”. This other person may be a psychiatrist, psychologist, counselor, etc. Pharmacotherapy is the medical term for using medicine to treat an illness. Of course, as is true of most physical and/or mental illnesses, persons suffering from eating disorders have a better chance of long-term recovery if they receive early treatment. Individuals who seek help after years of dealing with the disorder are more likely to require repeated hospitalization. Notice that doctors carefully refer to the need for weight "restoration" as opposed to "weight gain." This is because to anorexics, the idea of gaining weight is completely unacceptable. An anorexic person 's treatment team typically includes a psychiatrist, psychologist, specialist such as a gastroenterologist (a doctor who works with intestinal problems), dietary professional, social worker, occupational therapist, and nurse(s). Before treatment begins,

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