Do God And Evil Coincide?

Great Essays
Rebecca Berger
Clement
Philosophy 101
October, 15, 2015
Do God and Evil Coincide?

The issue with the presence of evil and the existence of God is most commonly the question of “if God is all powerful and all good, why does evil exist?” or “if evil exists then would God not be all-powerful or all-good?” If God was an all-powerful being then He would be able to prevent evil things – war, disabilities, natural disasters, etc. – from happening, but since they seem to occur every day, He must not be all-powerful, and therefore must not exist since God is described all an all-powerful all-good being. Corresponding to that if God was all-good then evil should not exist, but because evil does exist, God must not be all-good, and therefore making
…show more content…
His argument is that if God is all-good he would not create evil and if he is all-powerful then he would eliminate evil. He also says that you could deny the fact that evil exists, but it does exist. He also states that the people who claim God is not all-good do not mean it and that the people who claim He is not all-powerful do not mean it, however for God to be God he has to wholly be good and powerful. His argument is then supposed to prove that there is no God. He says that we try to come up with solutions so that God can logically exist, but they all fail at creating any logical arguments. One of our solutions is that good cannot exist without evil, but he says this is a fallacy because if God had limitless power then he could create good without evil, which means God does not exist. Next is that evil is as a means to good which is a huge restriction to God’s power because it is basically saying that God has to follow some sort of rule. Lastly there is the idea that evil exists because humans have free will; God could have and should have created us to only know and act good, which would then mean that evil would never have existed if he was actually all-powerful. He says that this disproves God because we would not have been created like this if he really were all-powerful, but I believe there was a …show more content…
however some people believe that the natural evil brings humans together to do good things. God’s ultimate goal for us is to achieve the greatest goodness, which is to become perfect. Although people are dying in these disasters, this is the kind of would we could expect from a traditionally Christian God. These disasters would occur despite human evil, so maybe God wants us to believe that at any moment we could die and our lives would end however we left it. Whether our lives were spent doing good things or if our lives were the epitome of evil itself and we had never did anything but benefit ourselves, would be what determines our

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    God does not want to be the puppeteer with humans as his puppets, thus giving humans free will. This is the reason for evil according to Augustine. “So too free will, without which no one can live rightly, must be a God-given good, and you must admit rather that those who use this good wrongly are to be condemned than that He who gave it ought not to have given it” . He argues that free will creates evil not a weak God. Natural disasters, death of a loved one, business failure, so many things are evil, and Augustine explains that the only reason any of that happens is free will .…

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In this case, we cannot define this action as an evil that God creates or necessarily warrants. However, evil exists because humans have free will to choose cruelty over good. However, Mackie responds, “why could He not have made men such that they always freely choose the good?” [1;334]. Mill proposes that perhaps, God just didn’t know how. And for the same reasons, this is why God couldn’t make humans to live longer or not wear down.…

    • 983 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Arguments From Evil: Elliot Sober I. Introduction The reality of evil existing in our world has been questioned throughout time based on the argument that an all powerful, all knowing, and all good (all-PKG) God cannot coexist with evil. The problem of evil only appears when there is a PKG God because if God is all powerful, all knowing, and all good then how could there still be evil. Therefore, if one of those properties we removed then there would no longer be a problem because then God couldn 't prevent evil from happening. For example, if God was not all powerful then it would be much easier to understand why evil happens because God doesn 't have the power to stop it.…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    God Allows Evil Essay

    • 1801 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Their argument is that if God really did exist (and he was a good/omnipotent God), then evil would not exist because he would not allow it to. These people are looking for answers as to why the cruelty and evil from events such the Crusades or the Holocaust were allowed to happen. Their argument comes from a place of compassion and justice for the victims of evil and cruelty (which eventually is all of us). This is a fair question that I believe deserves an answer. A second criticism of God is based on natural evil, rather than moral evil.…

    • 1801 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Aquinas Argument Essay

    • 1349 Words
    • 6 Pages

    God might have allowed us to suffer through pain so we can learn and we would be able to appreciate the good things in life much better. It may as well act as a cautionary sign from God to not do things that can instigate harm to our physiques or to the people surrounding us (Creel, 2013). Despite some philosophers’ such as Madden, Leibniz and Rowe’s arguments pointing out that the extensive and extent of evil in the world cannot justify the unseen greater good that may come about, it does not necessarily mean that there is no greater good that would occur or that God does not exist as some would have believed since these states of affairs are the kind which a supreme being would not allow God (Creel, 2008; Trakakis, 2006). Nevertheless, God cannot be held responsible for evil. This is because God does not possess human potentialities provided to human beings, which accordingly gives them the free will to choose between living up to the good nature initially brought to them, or doing evil (Creel, 2013).…

    • 1349 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Free will basically paves the road for God to allow mankind to learn by right or wrong, but if God saves the baby from the burning building we are not necessarily learning from certain mistakes. Since mankind has the free will to make wrong decisions, evilness will run its course. In conclusion, Hick is saying in order for God to be who he is portrayed as, evilness must exist. If evilness did not exist, then mankind would not have free will and therefore, our universe as we see it today would not exist the way it does (The Soul-Making…

    • 1098 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Spinoza's View Of God

    • 1670 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Furthermore, process theism describes God as an influencer not a coercer, trying instead to lure creation to the correct choice, but not preventing a wrong and potentially disastrous decision (Casanova, The Journal of Religion and Psychical Research, p. 49). Otherwise, horrific events such as the holocaust would have not occurred. In addition, there does seem to be limitations to God’s power in that he cannot create something imperfect, but that is because it’s not in God’s nature to be imperfect because God is perfection. Humanity may take something and make it imperfect or use it for an evil purpose, but that was not God’s intention. For Spinoza, there is no influencer to demonstrate his power; the power spoken of is just the power of Nature, the substance that brought about the constellations and the stars (Nadler, Humanities, p. 46).…

    • 1670 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If this is true and God is truly an all-knowing God, then we would not have free choice. It would contradict his power. An all-knowing God cannot ever be wrong. If he knew what was going to happen and every detail to anything then we were only following God’s wish not our free choice. Aquinas argued this, though.…

    • 1634 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Paradox Of Omnipotence

    • 1619 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Some people believe that evil is a necessary force in the world, that without it us as humans would not be able to recognize and appreciate the good that comes from the people around us. It is a common belief among theists that God, as our creator, allowed a finite amount of necessary evil in our world so that we can understand the concept of what “good” is. Solely based on the definition of God, that He is omnipotent and omnibenevolent, there should be no Evil that exists is the world. If He is truly omnipotent then he should be able to stop all evil from happening, likewise; if He is truly omnibenevolent then He should never create a being that is inclined to commit sin. It is clear to all of us that there is a considerable amount of evil…

    • 1619 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    This problem proves that there is a separate standard of right and wrong that has nothing to do with God or His commands. Most believers want to acknowledge an idea that right and wrong was created by their religion and God because they think they are not religious if they don’t associate right and wrong with God. Since this theory fails to connect morality with God, then believers of Him would dismiss it. This dismissal of the theory should not alter their faith in God, though. Many scholars and believers, like St. Thomas Aquinas, refused the Divine Command Theory for this reason but still believe in God and His instructions.…

    • 1238 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays