Richard Swinburne's Theodicy: The Logical And Evidential Problem Of Evil

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The evidential problem of evil determines the degree of how much evil must be a part of the evidence of God’s existence. While on the other hand the logical problem of evil is seen through our own eyes. It bares the question whether God is a perfect because of all wrong taking place in the world. Through these two problems it is hard to even imagine that God is perfect. Through Richard Swinburne’s theodicy (theodicy - an attempt to defend God's omnibenevolence in the face of evil) , one comes to find the case that initially escapes the evidential and logical problems
In the logical problem of evil, it is made aware that three things must be true in the contemporary version layout for evil to exist. They are that God is all good, He is all
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Swinburne offers a free will theodicy. Before explaining his theodicy it is important to note the two types of evil. Natural evil, which is caused by disease, unforeseeable accidents, and natural disasters. Then there is moral evil, caused by humans intentionally doing actions they should not be, or evil caused out of negligence. God offers free will, humans have the power of make significant choices between good and evil. Free will needs to be there in order for deeper goods to come from it. There needs to be a choice of good and evil so evil is not necessary. As for natural evil possibilities, the evil would be consistent with God. The natural possibilities of evil are explained through three premises. If God is omnibenevolent, then He seeks to give us the deepest of goods, if God seeks to give us the deepest of goods, He will give us free and responsible choice, if God gives us that choice, then there exists the natural possibility of evil. This comes to the conclusion that if God is omnibenevolent then the natural possibility of evil …show more content…
It is our choice for there to be more good and evil in the world. Some just happen to make the wrong decisions, such as Hitler, and while these events are extremely horrid justice does prevail from them. The poor souls did not die for any ordinary reason, but rather wars and tragic events that are similar, happen in order for us to learn from our past mistakes. A less horrid example would be if a criminal is placed in jail for a crime they have committed, it is likely the criminal will learn their lesson and not commit that crime again. There is a reason why history is studied in schools across the world, it is to make sure that previous events are not repeated. There is a contradiction in my own statement however because we often see history repeating itself. Yet, from my own prior knowledge from my high school history teacher; history was not placed into the school curriculum until early- mid 1900’s. This would mean if one was not introduced to history prior to the era they were unaware of previous events that have happened throughout

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