Fear And Discrimination

Superior Essays
Fear controls attitudes and decisions.
The world works in mysterious ways. The way it has developed overtime brings society to different stages of prejudice. Racism is manifested through culture clashes, and the behavior and attitudes and most of all fear. Many people in America feared what was unknown to them they wanted power and control. In order to control the fear they needed to make themselves known that they were superior, to those of different racial backgrounds. This brings about the way that racism is manifested through ignorance and fear. Not only did whites manifested fear but also African Americans, and if fear had not controlled the situation maybe racism would have not taken the path it did.
Prejudice comes from fear and
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Whites feared that if blacks were allowed to have full freedom they would be able to make their own money, gain power, and socialize with whites as if they were equal. The Civil right act was important because it helped slaves become politically, socially and economically part of a slight free society. But this was not successful because the act passed but it was never enforced, because it was seen as unconstitutional.
The fear of black’s gaining power and control drove whites crazy. In my opinion I think that if they would allow blacks to have equality from the beginning they would not be so eager to gain power through segregation. Giving them even more power, and more freedom of speech. At the start of the 20th century The US was divided between racial groups. In the 1900 lynching continued to happen.
Jim Crow laws were a huge part of the 20th century, they were in a way referenced to the theory commonly known a “separate but equal” treatment. Education was segregated, whites had their own schools and so did blacks. Also hotels and restaurants, event the military was segregated. The buses had two separate sections whites up front and black in the back. The blacks needed to offer their seats to whites. Famous African American women known as Rosa Parks refused to give u he seat to white man and this began the change to Jim Crow laws. Because blacks teamed up to boycott the bus. This
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This fear was passed down from generations and this is why it made it so difficult for blacks to achieve civil rights. All the wanted was equal opportunities such as employment, housing and education, as well as voting, access to public facilities, no more discrimination. For example in a book called “coming of age in Mississippi” by Anne Moody she writes about herself as Essie Mae. She’s a young girl trying to survive poverty as a child and as she grows up the prejudice of being a black woman. During her childhood she did not understand that there was a difference between being black and white and that both could not mix. Throughout the novel you can get a sense of fear because as a black individual your life can change with a single word. Anne Moody describes how mistreating whites can be a life sentence. As you read the novel you experience the sadness of losing a friend, the way that blood of an innocent is shed because they are not white. Anne Moody was an activist, she spoke and participated in many civil right movement. Such as the march in Washington with Dr. Martin Luther King

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