Difference Between Scientific Management And Human Relations

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Floris Witteveen - s2569734 Written assignment 4
1) What are the most important theoretical differences between Taylor’s Scientific management and the ‘human relations’ school of thought in early organization theory (e.g. the work by Mary Parker Follett and Elton Mayo)? Please utilize a table to summarize the theoretical differences.
Scientific management, according to Taylor (1967 [1911]), is the idea that one single way to handle work as well as organization exists, based on science that is done in field of management to detect certain standardized processes. (Clegg, Kornberger, Pitsis, 2011, 558). The idea implies that every single process can be either explained or solved by means of research.
The Human Relations school of thought is
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While the first theory thinks of an organization more as a system, the second is all about relations between people inside the organization.
2) What are the key drivers of organizational engagement in corporate social responsibility (CSR)? Utilizing different approaches to business ethics, as described in the book, reflect in what ways these drivers are ethically right or wrong.
Corporate social responsibility takes place if organizations are adhering to legal and other set standards, to do business in a way that considers multiple terms like e.g. the environment, social costs and benefits, and economical impact for the welfare of the society it is situated in (Clegg et al. 2011, 503). Ethics is the process of reflection on either good or bad past behavior, and thus business ethics is the reflection on either good or bad decisions in organizations (Clegg et al. 2011, 500).
There are certain drivers of organizational engagement that have an effect on corporate social responsibility (Clegg et al. 2011, Ch. 11). Ethics, instrumental and stakeholders are the three main drivers for
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(Clegg et al. 2011, Ch. 11). Some of the consequences of the instrumental driver include the possibility for higher profit, doing good for society but also can lead to self interest for organizations (Clegg et al. 2011, 508). The instrumental driver will not always work, though. When competitive organizations are actively using this driver no company will be unique (Clegg et al. 2011, Ch. 11). To be ethical, the organization shall thus utilize the instrumental driver in a successful way. The effect of instrumental driver will due to the competiveness of the companies be small, and because the effect on CSR will be small therefore be less

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