Summary Of Wesley Lowery They Can T Kill Us All

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Benjamin Spock once said, “Most middle-class whites have no idea what it feels like to be subjected to police who are routinely suspicious, rude, belligerent, and brutal” (Goodreads). With the minority in the United States, the majority never knows how tough lives of minorities can be. Wesley Lowery writes a book on the discrimination of police brutality and what he saw through his own cultural lens. He is an African American journalist for the Washington Post. Lowery attended Ohio University where he got his bachelor of Arts/Science. Wesley Lowery’s assignments included murders, stabbings, highway closures, drunk drivers and more. “They Can’t Kill Us All” is a book about Ferguson, Cleveland, North Charleston, Baltimore and the Racial Justice …show more content…
All people who experience discrimination from the media or the people of a nation want one thing. “Not a correction, or a rehabilitative article: they want to be heard, to be able to explain the injustice they believed was dealt to them so that their pain is validated” (Lowery 51). Family members of Michael Brown, Milton Hall, Stephan Averyhart, Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, and many other individuals shot by police officers want everyone to know how they feel resulting from the killings. The family members believe that their children are not to be the ones to blame for their deaths. Patricia Bynes, a protester and a member of a local Democratic committee explains “’There is this overwhelming feeling that they can shoot us, they can beat us –we can even have this stuff on video and the police officer still gets off. . . There is the idea that police officers are untouchables’” (Lowery 45). Between 2004 and 2014, only 54 officers out of more than 10,000 fatal police officer shootings by on-duty officers have been charged with a crime (Lowery 46). Police officers have been given leeway when it comes to shootings. The family members of those shootings have gone through extensive pain and suffering. There is an unfairness when it comes to the result of …show more content…
Slaves were dehumanized and the individuals experiencing injustice have been impacted. Their lives are opened. The relationships between police officers and African Americans seem similar, to an extent, toward the relationship to those of slaves and their masters. The masters treated the slaves in a way of throwing them around and dehumanization. Now the police officers are not dehumanizing the minority, but there is victimization and violence. “You never knew what it is to be a slave; to be entirely unprotected by law or custom; to have the laws reduce you to the condition of a chattel, entirely subject to the will of another” (Jacobs 86). African-Americans feel the same in a sense that the police officers are not necessarily protecting and serving. Those whose family members get shot by police officers feel as if the system is against their own race or ethnicity. Police officers have thrown around people, apparent in the Freddie Gray case, and made those seem like they have no given rights, evident in the Michael Bennett

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