Jane Addams: A Chicago Case Study

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Jane Addams, Daniel Burnham, and Richard J. Daley all had been affected by the city of Chicago. Jane Addams was more focused on individual neighborhoods, while Burnham and Daley were focused on the city as a whole. However, both Burnham and Daley seemed to compromise and favor certain areas of the city. For Burnham, the downtown area and lake front is where he focused his designs, and Daley always favored his home, Bridgeport.
Jane Addams focused more on the individual neighborhoods, particularly the West Side. She was a part of the social reformers and women on Chicago who wanted to improve schools and living situations of the poor. The West Side “contained a little bit of everything Chicago had to offer (Paycga, 113.)” It contained Jews
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his next major project became the Chicago Plan of 1909, which wanted to grow the city in size and create jobs. Like many progressives, he believed that the environment in which surrounds people, sets standards for how they act. He wanted to create a plan based on beauty, logic, and organization to make good citizens (Progressive Era Lecture & Pacyga, 173.)
He believed that public, semipublic buildings, libraries, and parks should be provided for the cities’ citizens. However, instead of providing these resources in individual neighborhoods, he wanted to create central places people could use, mainly downtown. For example, his plan included a cultural institution in Grant Park, and Outer Drive for pleasure and heavy loads, and his main focus was the Lake Front (Pacyga, 173-175.) He built beaches and parks. His plan was to be accomplished with the Commercial Elites and city leaders, but would ultimately be useful and positive for all classes (Pacyga, 173.)
Similarly, to Daniel Burnham and his focus of Chicago as a whole, was Mayor Richard J. Daley of Bridgeport. He was a resident of Bridgeport his entire life and it effected his political views, his views of Chicago, and how he saw the citizens of Chicago. This caused come bias towards his neighborhood and throughout his life he sometimes became blind issues such as the slums in Chicago (Daley: The Last
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He was serious and knew how to stand up for himself. Daley was very loyal to his neighborhood, church, parish, and Democratic Party (Pacyga, 289.) However, he claimed, “I see all neighborhoods in my neighborhood (Daley: The Last Boss.)” In addition, when he started his career as a Cermak Democrat during the Great Depression and Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, he learned how to control the immigrant and working class neighborhoods and party organizations (Pacyga, 290.)
His focus was the city as a whole. He loved building up the city and wanted to create jobs with projects around the city and jobs in law enforcement to name a few (Daley: The Last Boss.)” As Burnham wanted, Daley also wanted to make the downtown more appealing to investors and allow the economy to ultimately flourish (Pacyga, 341.)
Together, Jane Addams, Daniel Burnham, and Richard J. Daley wanted to better the community. However, they had different ways of going about change. Jane Addams believed in attacking social issues head on and within certain neighborhoods, whereas Daley and Burnham believed that creating projects and making the city beautiful would bring investors, who would bring jobs and improve

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