Crime Continuity And Adjudicated Delinquents

2154 Words 9 Pages
As social work students who are interested in the social work fields of private practice, criminal justice, and education, we are likely to encounter adolescents at-risk of encountering the juvenile justice system or with a history in the system. Included in the ever-growing prison population in our country are thousands of people under the age of 18. In late 2014, there were over 50,000 adolescents under the age of 18 in juvenile detention facilities and over 4,000 adolescents under the age of 18 held in adult detention facilities. (Juveniles in Corrections: Demographics, n.d.). The population of females in juvenile institutions is growing as well, in addition to the number of males (McGlynn, Hahn, & Hagan, 2012). Although the number of juveniles …show more content…
The same is true for thought patterns. Unhealthy patterns of thought will continue and be reinforced by behavior if not stopped or redirected by another force. CBT can be used to break such patterns of irrational or destructive thoughts. In the article “Crime Continuity and Adjudicated Delinquents” (2015), juveniles from ages 14 to 18, living in urban areas comprised of mostly African American and Hispanic males, were studied. Author Glenn Walters characterize psychological inertia by six cognitive variables: criminal thinking, positive outcome expectancies for crime, attribution biases, efficacy expectancies, goals, and values. Walters theorized that these variables must be extensively researched as they encourage repeated offending …show more content…
Unhealthy thought patterns are present in a variety of clients and situations that social workers are likely to encounter including anxiety, depression, substance abuse, addiction to romantic partners, and aggression (Van Wormer, 2011). In the United States, where insurance companies prefer quick-fix treatments, CBT has been and continues to be heavily relied upon as an intervention of choice due to the fact that is a short-term therapy (Van Wormer, 2011). Additionally, training in CBT methods is fairly simple and assessments are standardized and easy to access (Van Wormer,

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