Communism And The Iranian Revolution

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In the later 20th century, nationalism encouraged countries to reject foreign influence around the world, as seen by the Iranian Revolution, the creation of the Organization of African Unity, and the Solidarity Movement. The Iranian Revolution was a revolt against the Shah, a leader put into power by a foreign country (the US). Because of his secular rule and his numerous connections with the US, Iranians revolted and created the Islamic Republic of Iran. (Dove, Global Developments 1950s-1980s Notes) Iran replaced the Shah because he was connected to the US and repressed the Islamic religion. Islamic nationalists wanted to change this so they could practice freely, which shows how their nationalism led to the removal of external influence

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