Afterlife In Ancient Egypt

Superior Essays
Chronology of Ancient Egypt Exhibit
Pre-dynastic Period
4800-3100 B.C
Dynasty “O”
3100-3000 B.C
Archaic Period
3000-2686 B.C
Old Kingdom
2686-2125 B.C
First Intermediate Period
2160-2055 B.C
Middle Kingdom
2055-1650 B.C
Second Intermediate Period
1650-1550 B.C
New Kingdom
1550-1069 B.C
Third Intermediate Period
1069-664 B.C
Late Period
664-332 B.C

The nation of Egypt was mainly successful due to the location of the River Nile. The River Nile as portrayed in the Albany Institute of Art played a big role in Egypt’s progression as one of the greatest civilizations known to the modern world. The River fertilized much of the Egyptian soil and was not only a means of transportation but also
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The institute informed me that the Afterlife was basically a belief held by Ancient Egyptians that if you died, your spirit went through a perilous journey through the underworld and into the Hall of Judgment where Osiris, god of the dead, sat on his throne. The deceased would then be judged by his heart and weighed against the feather of truth. If one was judged negatively, they would be devoured by a monster known as Ammit, which was made up of multiple creatures such as lions and crocodiles. There was also a heart scarab that protected the judged against self-incrimination. If one was to pass the test, their spirit would move on to another life which was much like theirs with possessions that they were buried with. When a person died their spirit would become divine and their bodies mummified and put in a tomb to serve as a home for the spirit. The institute had multiple coffins which gave me an idea of how mummification and the afterlife may have been. The Afterlife in Ancient Egypt reminds me of Christian belief regarding heaven and hell and how the spirit moves on after the death of the physical body. In conclusion, the Afterlife influenced Egyptians by guiding them and also being a source of belief or faith in Egyptian society. The Egyptians lived by the belief of the afterlife and this belief guided and controlled their everyday activities because Egyptians wanted to peacefully pass over .The two mummies in the exhibit date from the 21st Dynasty and the other from the Ptolemaic Period. In 1909, the mummies and coffin bottoms were purchased from the Cairo Museum by Albany Institute board member Samuel Brown, a purveyor of coffees, teas, and spices in Albany. Dr. Peter Lacovara, Senior Curator of Ancient Egyptian, Nubian, and Near Eastern Art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, began working with. Institute staff on the Ancient

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