Foucault's Psychodynamic Approach To Psychology

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Foucault and Freud - two main thinkers, although Freud was basically a neu- rologist contributed greatly to mankind in understanding mental process of hu- mans. Michael Foucault was a homosexual thinker who had theories on the power relations between the various factions in society, about the relationship between knowledge and power and about a way of thinking that questioned a lot of assumptions or thoughts that are considered to be obvious or self-evident.
Sigmund Freud is consid-ered the founder of the psychodynamic approach to psychology which looks closely at the uncon-scious drives that motivate people to act in certain ways. Freud believed people are
Simply actors in the drama of their own minds, pushed by desire, pulled by coincidence.
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This method is one where the person is objectied and made to accept the knowledge of the psychoanalyst or the counsellor. This method is dierent from the rst two as in this method the person objecties himself.
From the above methods, objectication of a subject can be considered as a human being considering himself/herself or some part of him/her as an object and that this can be done again in roughly two means, either the external world objectifying you or, you subjectifying and then objectifying yourself. With this understanding of Foucault's work on objectication, Freud's work on psycho- analysis is analysed.
FREUD'S psychoanalysis
Freud's theory of psychoanalysis is based on three tenets which are three theories of his. The rst being the theory of unconscious where Freud gives a theory of the human mind being split into two major sections which are the conscious and the unconscious. The conscious mind is what he calls ego and it is this aspect of the mind that interacts with reality. The unconscious is further divided into two dierent parts which he calls as the Id and the superego. He denes Id
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Freudian psychoanalysis takes away and `conditions' or separates the pathological components of the society from the rest of society and this is done through objectication and disciplining techniques. Freudian psychoanalysis works in the following manner. Firstly people are categorised as pathological because of neurosis or some other problem like ho- mosexuality, etc. This is objectication of the subject in question. This is done via the use of totalising power of the society. Then the people in that category of people are taken for treatment to a psychoanalyst who in turn conditions them to conform to the normal of the society. This is done by the patient accepting that the knowledge of the psychoanalyst is greater than that of the patient.
Thus this is both totalistic where the psycho analyst is imposing his views of normal on you as well as individualistic where you choose to adapt your views to that due to you believing in the superior knowledge of the psychoanalyst. Then there is further objectication through the process of subjectication where you slowly change your own thought process, conduct etc. Finally the patient

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