Characteristics Of Child Development

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Identifying Developmental Characteristics The legal traditions in our country has, on all occasions, regarded between adults and children when it comes to distinctions in characteristics in development. As we take a look at the accounts of a child’s social scientific capacities we will be able to distinguish the proper treatment for a child, under the age of six years old, versus the treatment of an adult. The focus of the rights of a child will be analyzed and reflected in the theory of biology of the human brain. The influences that Piaget’s cognitive theory, reflecting the capacities of a child’s cognitive learning and understanding of consequences for their actions will be established. Indeed, because of the physical and intellectual …show more content…
Children under the age of six years old go through a period in their lives that is characterized by egocentric or self-centeredness, their perception is dominating and their thinking is intuitive, without reason which causes errors. A child will also find it difficult to understand experiences in their lives other than what they perceive these experiences to be. Nothing matters at this time of a child’s life but what they want and when they want it. Piaget’s theory states that egocentrism leads a child to believe everyone shares what and how they feel about things and adults think as they think. The child will regard this reality, thinking from only his perspective to be absolute or animism. At this age a child will be dominated by their own perception rather than logic, their understanding of most things are a fantasy instead of reality. Therefore, this way of thinking would lead us to believe that they are not capable of understanding the consequences of their actions. Piaget’s theory shows a child’s thinking is extremely different from that of an adult and from birth there is only a basic structure of the brain in which learning based upon. Piaget’s cognitive development is a reorganization in the mental process of the mind that results in biological maturity and environmental experiences. Without biological maturity, children will not construct the understanding they need of this world in which they live and discrepancies in their experiences of what they already have knowledge of or their discoveries of the environment will be faltered. (Berger,

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