Electromation Inc. V. NLRB: Main Issues

Superior Essays
Assignment Choice #1: Case Analysis (1992) Electromation, Inc. v. NLRB
Main Issues of The Case Electromation formed committees that they believed were employee participation programs that would mealy provide feedback to management regarding their recognition planning. A union was established after the committees where formed and after asking the company to disband them some committees still submitted proposals and continued their work. The main issue of the case was that the union didn’t agree that these committees were participation programs and they didn’t like the company directing and involving themselves in committees that discussed pay and other employment conditions. They felt that the committees constituted labor organizations
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The NLRB agreed that the committees formed by the organization constituted labor organizations and that the company interfered with the way the action committees were organized and that management interfered with employee initiated proposals that were presented to the organization (United States Court of Appeals, 1994). Electromation Inc. claimed that the action committees didn’t interfere with free choice of employees, they had no knowledge of union activity and were just seeking involvement from employees to find a solution to a company issue (United States Court of Appeals, 1994). Even though Electromation Inc. may not have intended to interfere with a labor organization their attempts at engaging employees to resolve company issues was unsuccessful and caused frustration all around. Not enough people wanted to participate, employees most likely felt that didn’t have enough say and were probably discouraged when management didn’t accept their proposals. The changes the company made to bonuses and raises had a direct impact on the employee’s way of providing for their families. With lack of success initially from the committees and most likely fear that their issues would never be resolved it’s easy to see why the Electromation Inc. employees felt that they …show more content…
While it was not the intention of Electromation to interferer and dominate the committees, they should have disbanded as soon as they were asked to by the union to prevent a lawsuit. Unions have been established to provide rites to organize, collectively bargain and prevent individual employees who speak up about unfair work conditions from being discriminated. However, the line regarding employee feedback can be blurry to employers, therefore employers be conscious of the laws so they don’t conduct unfair labor

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