Black Women Literature Review

Improved Essays
2. Literature Review: The impact of a high level degree The lack of black women representation and advancement, is due to lack of degrees; which causes the number of black women being elected for executive offices to remain sufficiently low. While examining economic improvement, Harvey (2008) and Epstein (1973) used surveys and black academics to figure out why black women choose short career paths. They discuss the difference between black women and other women career choices that require higher levels of education. Women from the black community make a choice work in the medical field as medical assistants, or hairstyles that causes their lives to become mediocre at its best. This choice using involved money, which causes them to …show more content…
Davison (1987) and Clayton and Stalling (2000) finds that black women that are working towards officeholder positions are facing challenges daily, due to being a women of color, being judged because of her identity, and sex oppression. These are all racial implication, this author believes that the black women working towards these higher positions, are being views upon their looks, and color; instead of their educational back grown, experience, and political achievements. Clayton and Stalling make suggestions to their audience, on how to achieve colorblindness, but also that beyond all the ending result is to obtain an executive position. Davison, Clayton, and Stalling gives strategies to overcome these challenges, and omission to move forward and continue to strive to make history. Green and King (2001) finds that the key to black women holding leadership positions, is back empowerment. Empowerment will help direct black women in the right career path, taking on challenges and knowing that their voice and opinions are more needed than ever. With black women having the state of mind to hold a place in leadership than to take a back seat, will help them overcome the disadvantage brought amongst people of color. Empowerment will also stop the trend of black women flowing below the labor market, and put them in the position as the breadwinner. Although all of these scholars have different point of views on the black women’s impact, they all involve advancement, and how to get there. It is clear who these authors audience is, and as they attempt to reach out to the black women of America to strive for more; earning a law degree and/ or Ph.D. will put these women in the position to return the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    However, there are a lot of issues that ties back to women of color. In this article of Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference, Lorde mentions, “…women of Color can only be taught by Colored women, or that they are too difficult to understand, or that classes cannot “get into” them because they come out of experiences that are “too different.” (4). At times women of color will taught other women of color to understand the difficult that women redefining themselves differently. Which it also related to where women of color doesn’t have feminist leadership where women of color come together and fight for their own…

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Even in homes women 's roles expanded as they took on more responsibility. Women gained more freedoms but they still needed to fight for their rights and status in society. Slavery ended, which changed the roles and lives of many black women. They received more control over their lives, but they did not escape from racism and sexism. Society forced black women into “feminine” jobs and confined them to the typical role of a woman in a household.…

    • 1572 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Black Women In The 1800s

    • 1254 Words
    • 5 Pages

    These young women are intelligent and most are eager to improve themselves. If as much time and money were spent on educating them properly and providing them with meaningful work as is spent on imprisoning them and foster care, one can only begin to imagine the shift that could take place. Black women in the United States today are fighting several battles at once. We are fighting for the right, which should have been ours at birth, not to be discriminated against because of our race, our class, or our gender. Ours is not and never has been a struggle simply against sexism but one waged against the multiplicative oppressions of sex, class, and race united in one single body.…

    • 1254 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    African American women are affected by these stereotypes in the way they see themselves and how that affects the way they identify with being African American and a woman. Wilkins wrote in her article, "Black women grapple with controlling images in their daily lives, using them to make sense of their own experiences and identities" (Wilkins 175).These controlling images that Wilkins described influence the stereotypes that African Americans women are forced to deal with constantly throughout their lives on a regular basis. By having such stereotypes integrated in women as they are growing up, African American women have to deal with how these stereotypes affect how they grow up. Stereotypes affect how African American women view themselves and shape their own…

    • 1582 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It can also form coalitions of women to form around African-American women’s challenges. If women from different parts of the world such as Indonesia, Mexico, and much more hear about another woman has to go through so many challenges as an African-American woman. They will be able to relate more since they are both females and they understand that it is not easy being an African American woman living in America. Consequently, the challenges that women face is very different from how a man handles it. People need to get out of only being focus on gender every time that something happens, women need to be included.…

    • 887 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Antebellum Gender Equality

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages

    African American women still faced discrimination in both the North and South, regardless of the laws and amendments passed to protect their liberation, which had an impact on further reform movements as well (Faulkner 141). However, “supportive community networks and settlement houses [were created to help]… girls and women of color in need of housing and resources” (“Claiming Their Citizenship: African American from 1624-2009.”). Ultimately, both discrimination and support for African American women balanced out, which changed their…

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The purpose of this study is to examine the intersectionality of race and gender for African American women working at predominately white institutions as faculty, staff, and/or administrators. Many Black women working in higher education often experience marginalization, social exclusion, and lack effective mentoring in academia. Using a theoretical approach, I will use the critical race theory and black feminist thought as the framework to explore the effects race and gender has on African American women professional careers in higher education. Throughout this research paper, the terms Black and African American are used interchangeably and PWI is an acronym for Predominately White Institution(s). Critical Race Theory (CRT)…

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The first chapter, The age is ripe for the women question, begins the quest of defining what role women reformers wanted to play, and what their goals should be focused on. Anthony ultimately decides that the vote should be primary goal, but Dudden does touch on some other subjects that get placed on the back burner, such as sexual autonomy, legal and property rights. Chapter two, Black Rights, Women 's Rights, and Civil, focuses on our two key players, Anthony and Stanton, taking a step and fighting for the end of slavery, because as Dudden reveals, Anthony believed that their efforts in the war would benefit both women and black (male) suffrage in the end (60). In Chapter three, The Negro 's Hour, new lines are drawn as Wendell Phillips introduces his "Negro Hour" theory. This theory will ultimately divide Phillips and Anthony for the remainder of the text and will also place Anthony in a subordinate role to Phillips because he holds the purse strings to the Hovey Fund.…

    • 1150 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Within history women always struggled to gain respect, equality, and want the same rights as men. Women had to go through years of sexism and struggle to get to where we are right now. The struggle was very difficult for women of color because not only were we dealing with issues of racism, but also sexism. Many movements have helped us black women during the past centuries to overcome sexism, racism, and the battles that were set against us. But although these movements helped the black woman it did not abolish the racism altogether.…

    • 1324 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Black Hair Culture

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Presently, black women are still actively practicing in these practices and as a result are being scrutinized and frowned upon by their pairs, society and most recently in films. “Good Hair” a 2009 documentary directed by, actor and comedian, Chris Rock explores the practices of hair styles among black woman. Rock, the narrator, claims he created the documentary after his daughter ask “daddy, why don’t I have good hair?” Throughout the documentary, Rock is seen interviewing a number of outstanding black African American women in American culture; the list includes, Nia Long, Eve, Tracie Thomas, Salt-n-Papa, Salli Richardson, Raven-Symone and Maya Angelou about their ideals on black hair. Based on the documentary, it is implied, black women use chemicals on their hair and wear weaves due to low self esteem, self hatred and the desire to be white like; however, on the contrary, many black women participate in these practices because of the effects of colonialism, their attempt to survive into mainstream culture and the pressure to conform to European standards of…

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays