Bamboo People Book Report

Improved Essays
While the problems of a foreign land might not initially attract some juvenile readers, the candor and simplicity of Perkins’ writing make not just the book, but the intellectual and political ideas behind the plot and theme, accessible. Short chapters help the book’s readability as well. Bamboo People is a novel that is skillfully told that we realize only much later that we’ve been educated to boot—which is as should be.
The novel introduces not one but two different cultures. Perkins weaves information about language, food, customs and religion into the story, making it informative without being awkward. Food is shown: “I squeeze lime over my food and start eating” (9). Later Tu Reh thinks, “Peh places both hands on my shoulders. I try not
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The Karenni tribe kept their hopes up despite incredible loss, still dreaming and talking of the day when they would once again become a free nation. Their use of bamboo is highly creative—homes, bridges, transportation, weapons, food, storage, irrigation—all these and more are depended on the resilient, lavish, and ecologically efficient bamboo plant. Moreover, bamboo is a strong, independent and useful plant that can tolerate any ecological change, similar to the Karinne, who act as an excellent symbol for the plant. “... And that’s why I’m [Peh] going to stay like bamboo, Tu Reh. I want to be used for many purposes. Not just one” …show more content…
Due to Perkins writing style from the first person format, their internal dialogues felt overly repetitive at times. Tu Reh’s dilemma is, at the root, an interesting one. While Chiko, an innocent forced into war, comes from a morally good place and his journey is largely one of physical transformation, Tu Reh’s character arc is more intellectual. Perkins skillfully gives us two young narrators, who have an extremely complicated connection; manage an influential bond, find the humanity in their situation. With little reason to hope, they manage to persevere. Chiko and Tu Reh, as well as the other characters in the novel, realize that becoming educated and wise is more important than hanging onto

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