Arguments Of A Democratic Deficit

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Democratic Deficit The plurality of Eurosceptic people argue that the European Union has a democratic deficient and I believe they are correct. The EU is fairly removed from individual nation-state governments and lack of accountability results in the loss member-state soverignty (Coughlan 2004). A democratic deficit refers the involvement of citizens in decision-making, and it is a foundational part of a legitimate government (Follesdal and Hix 2006). As discussed earlier, EU law is precedent over nation law. An added issue on top of my last point is that those responsible for creating and imposing EU law are the European Commission and the European Court of Justice. However, none of these members are directly elected as by EU citizens. …show more content…
Euroenthusiats argue that the EU is not a threat to state sovereignty (Adler-Nissen 2011). When joining the EU, member-states join with the understanding that ceding national sovereignty in some areas is necessary, in exchange to benefit from different policy areas (Adler-Nissen 2011). Euroenthusiats view relinquishing national power to the EU is simply an exchange to be apart of a multinational organization by which they can continue to participate in decision-making within a larger framework (Coughlan 2004). Member-states do still posses a degree of sovereignty. The very fact that Britain has the ability to call for a referendum demonstrates state sovereignty. However, my findings lead me to believe that even with the understanding that the EU will obtain some state sovereignty, the degree which they have imposed on nation-states control of their country is rather large. Having EU law take precedence over state la, infringes apron states parliaments. Moreover, even if the European Project is seen a framework for pooled sovereignty, this still shows that individual states are at a loss of power. Instead of being able to act independently, each state much considers their neighbors. The issue that arises from this is that there is a lack of demos in the EU. A state has the right to always put their national interest first. Individual nations, such as Britain, identify them selves of citizens of the UK before viewing themselves as EU citizens. Anything that threatens that national unity thereby threatens state

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