Analysis Of The Habit Loop

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The Habit Loop In his book The Power of Habit (2012), Duhiggs explains “this process within our brain is a three-step loop” (p. 19). That is, the three essential components that make up this ‘habit loop’ are as follows: a cue, a routine, and a reward. Beginning with the first step, a cue is a trigger that overrides the brain to enter an automatic and involuntary mode, before determining which habit to carry out. In this case, an alarm clock going off would be the cue. Clearly, the blaring alarm sound functions as a signal to be awaken. Then, comes a routine, which can vary from an emotional or physical response. In this case, the routine would be getting dressed to go to work. Essentially, it’s everything in between from the moment of waking …show more content…
Each of these will relinquish an obstacle in relation to the stage presented. At first, when acknowledging the formation of a new habit—or even the abandoning of an old one—one must first launch themselves with a strong-willed mind and ambitious attitude, as humanly possible. This allows the beginning stage of change to form a stable, dedicated foundation which will reinforce the essential motives. Initially, allowing oneself to engage in situations that’ll compliment and envelop these actions. For instance, this will enable such an impetus that the desire to break down will not occur as soon as one might expect; and with each addition day that this breakdown is postponed, reinforces the chances that this manifestation will not occur (para. …show more content…
As noted by Duhiggs (2012), rewards are powerful in the sense that they give satisfaction to cravings. However, it is believed that we’re not always conscious of the driven forces that act out our behaviors; which, as previously mentioned, make it difficult to monitor these cravings (cues). Subsequently, he recommends experimenting with different routines that’ll replace the original reward; in other words, seek out a different reward. For example, in the context of someone who smokes a cigarette every time they feel nervous, should try adjusting that routine by perhaps going for a walk. And repeat. Only this time, instead of going for a walk they should try calling a friend. Duhiggs notes that what you choose to do instead isn’t important, it’s trying to identify the craving steering the routine. Is it feeling nervous? Or is it wanting to feel the sensation offered by puffing a

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