Analysis Of Stephen King's On Writing

Improved Essays
King might be best known for writing horror novels but On Writing is a real work of high art and transforms genre in the otherwise dreading and plethora style of writing books. Dr. Lawrence Nannery, a professor of philosophy at St. Francis College, defines high art as having a full understanding of the work “can enhance an understanding of other aspects of life as well” and “does not reveal everything it has in one exposure.” For example, in prose, writing genres work to normalize certain academic aspects and beliefs embodied within them. But these aspects are often portrayed so incorrectly that they either border on, or are completely submerged in ideology. However, King transforms this genre and doesn't reveal it so easily and freely, what he does is makes individuals understand concepts that are otherwise unattainable in an unpredictable and unorthodox manner. …show more content…
Many writers attract negative criticism, but few of them seem quite so hated by their belittlers as Stephen King is. According to Marcus Geduld in “Should Stephen King Get More Credit As A Writer From Literary Critics?” King’s prose simple “gets the job done” or is “just a hack” and can only describe a blurry world in general terms when he strays from his obsessions: horror. Undoubtedly, the role of the critics are vital. The critic is the second most important facet, next to the author and the work

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Fiction Vs Nonfiction

    • 1271 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Through the methods in which a writer creates a fictional story by using devices such as, Character, plot, and point of view they are able to expand and enhance our ability to understand other human beings; it promotes a deep sense of morality that affects all readers. Subsequently, fiction’s happy endings have distorted the reader’s sense of reality for the betterment of society. As a matter of fact, fiction is more effective at challenging our beliefs than nonfiction, which is made to persuade through argument and evidence. As readers we tend to be reticent, analytical and suspicious of what we read when it comes to nonfiction. But when it comes to a work of fiction, we are quick to indulge our minds into the made up universe, making it effortless…

    • 1271 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sartre made the movement popular by defining what Existentialism meant; he wrote various works centered on his views alone. The more these works were read, the more the smiles of those with a fulfilled life faded away. Sartre is perhaps the most well-known, as well as one of the few who accepted being called an "existentialist". Being and Nothingness is his most important work, and his novel Nausea helped to popularize the movement. It may have been the relatable feeling of losing interest in things that once brought joy; or the adversity faced when ending and surviving a relationship.…

    • 901 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Novels with endings that can leave readers feeling emotional or puzzled. Foster’s Law of Shutting Doors suggest that the ending portion of the book is all entirely based upon how the writer want their particular group of readers to react: “The degree of closure in the ending of a novel is in direct proportion to the eagerness of the novelist to please his audience” (271). Writers want to please their readers, but sometime, endings are not so great of a big deal than the rest of the plot. Foster mention how some works are either left “unfinished” (275) or “leaving the protagonist hanging” (275). In J.D.…

    • 2009 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dystopian novels are so fascinating because they show how powerful and influential one person can be. The inspirational dystopian stories get individuals to realize that they have the power to change whatever they are unsatisfied with. This inspirational element is present in all dystopian novels. For example, in Equilibrium, Cleric John Preston stops taking his dose and discovers how it feels to have emotions. He realizes how cruel society has become without emotions and feelings for one other.…

    • 1448 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Orwell explains that his writing is a product of the times, and that if he had lived in peaceful times it would be likely that his fiction would be very different than it is ow. However, he writes about what is necessary to write about: anti-totalitarianism and pro-democracy. What is interesting to this reader was Orwell’s confessions at the end of the essay, stating that all writers are rather possessed by a strange demon because writing is really not very enjoyable.…

    • 915 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Not everyone finds books to be equal in value or importance because we all have our own tastes in writing. In the article, The Great Gatsby, lead literary critic, H.L. Mencken, criticizes and reviews one of Scott Fitzgerald’s more popular novel, The Great Gatsby. In his writing, Mencken what he dislikes and what he believes is lacking in Fitzgerald’s novel. To accomplish the feat of criticizing a well-liked book without invoking an indignant reaction, Mencken uses rhetorical strategies to convince the reader of the flaws of the novel.…

    • 790 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Grey: Fifty Shades Of Grey

    • 4974 Words
    • 20 Pages

    Many literary critics label it as a pulp fiction as it does not come up to the level of true literary writing and genuine story telling techniques. However, the point of contention in this regard may be that story telling is a huge cosmos that cannot be limited into specific category boxes. However, good and bad novels and their impact on socio-economic and cultural conditions of society can be simulated through critical method. Despite being heavily criticized from various journalists and novelists, the Grey will have an impact on the thrashing the boundaries of limitations which have been put into place through censorship boards. One can say it is a step forward towards the sexual emancipation of society, but with a…

    • 4974 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There is a diverse group of people reading this book, and not everyone is able to understand the dark satire that runs throughout the book. As Mason explained, the readers are not to be blamed as Twain is known for creating confusion. He says, "At every point, one must be aware of his ventriloquist 's voice, parodic themes, and ironic author commentary" (222). Meaning, that if the reader doesn 't keep these literary components in mind, they will have a very challenging time understanding that Twain is making fun of a racist, illogical society and just trying to get his point across. However, just because his underlying message is meaningful, it doesn 't mean that it is conveyed effectively because many completely overlook it and feel as if the message is too buried underneath all of the racist remarks, irony, and satire.…

    • 1112 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many of the professional literary critiques that emerged following the publishing of Frankenstein were less than positive in their evaluations of its quality and value. Some of these critics devalued it based on its failure to present a positive message to readers while others criticized inconsistencies within the story. One article that criticized both aspects of this novel was The Literary Panorama and National Register’s “Review of Frankenstein; or the Modern Prometheus.” This paper was well known in this era and considered a credible source of information regarding literature. Despite offering superficial compliments, the author attempts to prove that this work of fiction is a disappointment considering the school from which it proceeds. While some evidence is given to prove this thesis, it seems to lack relevance and weight.…

    • 1004 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Edgar Allan Poe: several critics claim that this man is a wannabe literary author. Because Poe tends to build a fearsome mood throughout his narratives, and strives his best to do so, people are apt to overlook the beauty of Poe’s structure and creativity in his writings. A great hypothesis to why Poe always writes such disturbing tales comes straight from an article written by Carl Goldberg. According to a section of “The Secret that Guilty Confessions Fail to Disclose”, “writing served for Poe as a reflection of his inner being” (Goldberg, 181). Poe seemed to write about many distressed individuals and thoughts; by doing this, he tends to represent his characters as his own self.…

    • 2144 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays