The Balance Of Freedom In Ayn Rand's Anthem

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Ayn Rand’s perspective in his book ‘Anthem’ regards humans as beings who have an inviolable right to independence and freedom for themselves, as it is derived from their very nature, but shows how when you take it all away it detriments the society’s progression as a whole along with personal satisfaction and joy. Her claim in the book is “that a man has rights which neither god nor king nor other men can take away from him, no matter what their number, for his is the right of man, and there is no right on earth above this right,” (Anthem, page 101-102). No matter the case, there is nobody that is above the moral laws of humans under any circumstance. In Anthem, everyone was not able to say the word I, as it stood for independence and difference …show more content…
In perspective, you can see three types of freedoms that people either use or fight for: physical, spiritual, and individual freedom, and with those you must find the equilibrium. When it comes to physical freedom, people should be able to act and say what they want to a certain limit. Ultimate freedom does not include the right to cause harm to others just because you claim to have sovereignty over your life in order to do whatever you want. By doing this, you would be hindering the freedoms held by other individuals. Spiritual freedom is another widely debated topic, which is essential to living an unimpeded life. Religion is a personal freedom for people, and when boundaries start to be placed over it, it can cause disruption amid the community and can cause people to loose trust. Without trust, there cannot be a system that can effectively lead people in the right direction. With those two in mind, individual freedom stands for the ability of every person to be themselves. This right is an opportunity to be happy in what you do without holding back and without caring about what others do. With all three different freedoms together holds great responsibility and trust. People should be able to say what they want to say, do what they want to do, and believe in what they want to believe in, as long as it causes no harm. This sort of freedom becomes a moral responsibility as it holds great power. For the span of mankind, humans have still yet to solve this unanswered puzzle of how to please everyone while maintaining control in the community. It may have to come to the point where even though people should be entitled to ultimate freedom, they have to realize that every cause cannot be won, and that they cannot have control over everything. The clashing of one person to the next prevents this ideal world that has yet to be seen. As society goes on, there will still be wars,

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