Advantages And Disadvantages Of Urbanisation

Great Essays
The world is urbanising rapidly. In 2008, the number of people living in cities exceeded those in the country side. Urbanisation per se is often a positive development, as urban areas tend to be more productive than rural areas…yet rapid urbanisation can outreach the capacities of cities to absorb and cater for an ever growing number of inhabitants
(Matuschke 2009). India is not an exception to the general urban scenario in the world. It is becoming more urban albeit regional variations across the country. It has grown as the second largest urban system after China. With its huge urban population residing in 7935 towns (Census of India 2011), the country’s urban population has grown to over 377.1 million (31.16 percent). With urbanisation,
…show more content…
The houseless people in urban areas have grown at an alarming rate during 2001-2011 (20.5%) despite decline of growth rate in case of total houseless population (-8.8%) as well as rural houseless population (-28.4%) in the same period. It seems that majority of rural houseless persons have shifted to the urban areas.
According to the McKinsey Global Institute (2010), India faces the mammoth task of providing affordable homes to an estimated 38 million households by 2030. Urban poverty is another crucial urban challenge in India. According to HPEC (2011), even though urban poverty has declined but there were still 80.8 million urban poor in
2004-05 which grew from 76.3 million in 1993-94. The poverty ratio decreased from 32.4 percent in 1999-2000, to 25.7 percent in 2004-05 and further to 20.9 percent in 2009-10 but at the same time, the absolute number of urban poor continues to be high at 76.3 million, 80.8 million and 76.5 million respectively. The latest poverty estimates (based on
Tendulkar Methodology) show urban poverty level at 53.1 million
(13.70% of urban population) in 2011-12.
In the above context, urban development/management of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    As of 2011, 50.6% of the Chinese population lives in an urban environment, considerably higher than India’s 31.3%, a clear indicator of India’s demographic spread. China dominates the world in manufacturing, exporting $2.341383 trillion in 2014, 22.6% of their total GDP. While India exports a higher percentage, 23.6% of their GDP, $487.788966 billion is only about one fifth of China’s nominal exporting value. This vast difference in exports can be attributed to the path the countries underwent during their 1970’s-1980’s reformations. “China has pursued a manufacturing-led growth strategy whereas India has chosen a more services-based development model” (Kumar).…

    • 864 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    As consumption spending and business investment dried up, massive job loss followed. The US labor market lost 8.4 million jobs, about 6.1% of payroll employment. Some 46.2 million Americans lived below the official poverty level in 2010, which is about 15.1 percent of the population. The number of people living in poverty grew by 27 percent between 2006 and 2010. Poverty increased greatly among the Hispanics and African Americans, households of women, and working class adults between the ages of 18-34.…

    • 1857 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    III. EUROZONE RETAIL PMI • Sales fall modestly for third consecutive month in January. • Downturns recorded in each of the ‘big-three’ Eurozone economies. • Job creation sustained despite recent weakness in sales. The headline Markit Eurozone Retail PMI – which tracks month-on-month changes in like-for-like retail sales in the bloc’s biggest three economies combined – remained below the neutral 50.0 mark in January, registering 48.9.…

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Two paths are overall more impactful because they deal with how the cities which will see the most population growth will develop in the near future. The two paths are controlled urbanism and late-stage growth. Controlled urbanism typically “occurs in small, less developed countries that grow very rapidly and transition into wealthy cities” (New Lenses 29). By quickly raising its GDP through outside influence from an economic development project, the city is capable of rapid growth as people flock to the city in search of jobs. With the driving force of the economic project, the city is able to keep up with the growing population and continue to gain…

    • 1455 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Wealth Gap In America

    • 1338 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In “Why Income Inequality Threatens Democracy” Ray Williams states “In 81 percent of American counties, the median family income, about $52,000, is less than it was 15 years ago. This is despite the fact that the economy has grown 83 % in the past quarter-century and corporate profits have doubled. American workers produce twice the amount of goods and services as 25 years ago, but get less of the pie.” The income inequality in the U.S has been steadily increasing for decades. Not only is the wealth gap highly concentrated to the wealthiest people but also the income gap is just as unequal. Movements such as Occupy Wall Street in 2011 have rose awareness to the income gap, but have barely dented the fabric of wealth inequality.…

    • 1338 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    With a population of 26.6 million people, the Kathmandu Valley is growing at the 4.7 percent per year, one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in South Asia. However, urbanization brings challenge; especially in the developing countries in terms of improving the urban environment and the living condition. Urbanization leads to the emergence of commercial and industrial activities within the area but the historic city areas, having failed to keep pace with the requirements of the modern economy, start to deteriorate. While historic cities area indentitarian, core to the city both historically and geographically, they are also central to many…

    • 1191 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Chinese Immigrants

    • 1016 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Since United State’s economy crashed in 2010, United States faced one of the hardest economic crises in history ever. The unemployment rate was highly up to 9.8%(1), and its real estate market’s value dropped more than 35%(2). Meanwhile, Chinese immigrants were continuously raising, and research studies showed these new Chinese immigrants had brought economic improvement to United States. California was one of the faster states recovered from economic crisis, the result had a direct relationship to the majority of new immigrants settled in California. Take San Francisco Bay Area as an example, there were 7.8% of Chinese population, and roughly 17% of these Chinese population immigrants have came since 2008.…

    • 1016 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The level of urbanization can be defined as the proportion of the total population that is living in urban centers. In India, Tamil Nadu is one of the fastest growing urbanised states compared to the other. Urbanisation is an integral part of the development process and it increases the employment opportunities for people. Because of which more people migrate to urban centres. The Percentage of migration in Tamil Nadu was 24.04 in 1991 census and it has increased to 25.36 in 2001 census.…

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    This therefore resulted in a higher overall unemployment rate. However, within the past few years the unemployment rate has started to rise again, Unemployment in South Africa is now higher than it was at the end of apartheid. Labor-force participation rates have also remained low with the effect of globalisation. After initially rising post-1994 and peaking at near to 60% in 2000, labor-force participation rates dropped to an average of 57.4% in the pre-crisis years between 2000 and 2008. The global financial crisis resulted in the labor-force participation rate dropping to 55% between 2009 and 2011, but it then recovered to the 57% mark in recent…

    • 1547 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Tesco's Financial Summary

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Tesco see the biggest reduction – with decreasing Trade Payables and a significant reduction in short term borrowings between 2012 and 2013. Tesco’s Non-Current Liabilities have decreased by £535 million from 2009–2013. This supports comments in the Tesco’s 2013 financial report in which the financial director highlighted his aim to reduce net debt significantly over the medium term. However closer inspection shows a rising trend from a low in 2011. Sainsbury’s Non-Current Liabilities on the other hand shows a relatively steady but manageable increase.…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays